Committee of the Whole - 28 Mar 2023


1: Welcome to the Squamish Nation Traditional Territory
2: ADOPTION OF AGENDA
3: MOTION TO CLOSE
4: DELEGATIONS
4.i: Ambulance Paramedics of British Columbia, CUPE Local 873
4.ii: Squamish Community Foundation Annual Report - Community Grants
5: TERMINATION
- Welcome, Delegation - Ambulance Paramedics of BC, CUPE Local 873
0:00:00 (0:29:57)

[4484] During a Committee of the Whole Meeting on March 28th, the Squamish Nation was acknowledged and the council meeting was recorded and will be available on the District of Squamish website. [4490] President Troy Clifford and other ambulance paramedics gave a presentation about updates and perspectives from the previous year. The BC ambulance paramedics union represents 4,600 paramedics across BC and advocates for resources and care for patients, while building relationships with local governments and partners in public safety. However, they are understaffed and under-resourced, which impacts other emergency services and puts patients at risk. They aim to increase resources in the area, including a second 24-hour full-time ambulance and an advanced life support response unit. They also propose a community paramedic program to support community wellness and provide alternate pathways for mental health and addiction responses. [4491] Squamish provides 24/7 coverage with two full-time Alpha cars, but the resources have decreased from three to two, limiting the services provided to the community. [4493] The community seeks clarification on the restoration of the Juliet car, and [4500] there is currently a lack of planning and communication between health authorities, transport agencies, and ambulance services, causing added pressure and problems when resources change. [4502] Collaboration between community response teams, paramedics, ambulance services, and healthcare providers is essential to improving patient care and supporting citizens. [4505] The speakers thanked the ambulance paramedics for their presentation on advocacy and providing tools for asking the right questions during the upcoming Vancouver Coastal Health public engagement and master planning process.

Eric Andersen
0:00:00 (0:00:55)

the committee the whole meeting for March 28th we are convened on the traditional and unseated territory of the Squamish Nation acting mayor Anderson in the chair please be advised that this council meeting is being live streamed recorded and will be available to the public to view on the District of Squamish website following the meeting if you have concerns please notify the corporate officer present at the meeting we have a presentation from the ambulance paramedics to British Columbia I believe we are joined by President Troy Clifford of the ambulance paramedics and emergency dispatchers of BC Mr Clifford are you joined by other colleagues if you may introduce yourself and I do recall a very engaging presentation from you approximately years a year ago and you may have some updates and perspective to share with us again thank you please proceed

SPEAKER_04
0:00:56 (0:01:27)

absolutely thank you so the presentation I have about 10 minutes and then some question and answer period I understand is that yes Mr Clifford okay thank you so yes I'm Troy Clifford I'm the president with the amulet paramedics of BC as you mentioned I do have two colleagues with me that also are associated with the ambulance paramedics one is a squamous resident who's been a long time paramedic and now works at the QP National rep and that's chairman Hillier um he lives in works out of Squamish he's our national representative with the Canadian Union of public employees he's a transition from a paramedic life to our national rep so he's obviously a resident of Squamish and then also with us is um another Resident of Squamish but has recently transitioned to Pemberton because she's got the unit Chief spot she runs the station in Pemberton and that's Kelly budway and so Kelly is also a regional vice president with the ambulance paramedics in the Lower Mainland How Sound Sunshine Coast region and like I said Chief the chief in Pemberton but has a lot of extensive knowledge of the cedar side Skyway um and I'll just I don't know if they're muted or not but if they sorry I thought they weren't on here to talk so if they can I don't know if they have anything to add to introductions just quickly while we're before I get into the whole presentation

SPEAKER_07
0:02:23 (0:00:08)

hello Kelly budway thank you Troy for the introduction I believe Troy's stated enough thank you for having us today

Eric Andersen
0:02:32 (0:00:02)

welcome Ms Broadway

SPEAKER_04
0:02:34 (0:00:03)

and Sherman did you have anything to add

Armand Hurford
0:02:38 (0:00:09)

hi there thanks for having me Sherman Hillier I and nothing to add over what Troy said figured out the camera so that's helpful

SPEAKER_04
0:02:48 (0:15:15)

right I stole their Thunder yeah so um again I'm Troy Clifford I'm the president with the ambulance paramedics and my role it's the is to lead the provincial local of the amulet paramedic which represents 4 600 paramedics across BC as well as our dispatchers and call takers in every corner of this province I've been a 35-year paramedic and when I'm not doing this job like my colleagues I have a real job and that I am the station Chief just like Kelly and Pemberton but I'm in Insidious so a lot of my experiences in the interior but I work down in Lower Mainland and I spend a lot of time here and both of all of us don't get to spend as much time on car as we'd like to but all our paramedics and dispatchers that are Union Officers in the ambulance paramedics are working paramedics and that's part of our structure and so I've been a 35-year paramedic and definitely seen a few things and we're gonna one of the things I why I like to have in a conjunction with me that's local people is they can add another perspective if you have questions on that I'm fairly familiar with the area and the and the How Sound and obviously but it gives another perspective and gives some local people that you can contact if you're not interested in talking to the provincial guy or if you have other questions locally so that's sort of what our thing is but today is really about opening that conversation continuing the dialogue that we've had with communities and their needs and that so I'll just go over a few things quickly and I think they'll stimulate a lot of questions so we can save that until after the quick presentation there's a lot of things to cover off and it's really key to continuing these relationships with the municipalities and local governments from our perspective so like I said there's a couple things that are unique to the ambulance paramedics of BC we like I mentioned we're the traditional Union that does all the representation for all those members that I mentioned Labor Relations on our statute duties under the labor code representation bargaining all that sort of stuff so that's our traditional Union rule but in BC we're also very unique in the sense that we are also the professional voice of paramedics in BC and what that means is that we're the voice of paramedics at part of the paramedic Association Canada where the BC chapter so we do that dual role and that's unique to us compared to most professions and unions because most have a separate entity as a as an association or a union including paramedic Association across Canada so that's a and it's just the way it was set up in BC and quite frankly it's really important for us because that's how our members identify so why that's important to tell you that background is that's why you see us at these type of engagements is that our role or in lobbying Community for resources Service delivery increased scope of practice and care that we can provide our patients and relationships with the local governments and our partners in public safety police and fire emergency preparedness and those sorts things of and that's in why we do that is because our members actually expect that of us and it's part of a key to our overall advocacy and representation so there's another dual role that we have in BC that and it and it's also unique to us is we're the only profession that crosses two boundaries and that's um you know obviously we're a health union we're a health profession and that's our linkage to the health authority through obviously under the Ministry of Health provincial Health Services Authority and ultimately need a bcehs that runs the ambulance service so this is all exciting stuff and but what that means is that we're clinically and our structure is within the health authority but we're also designated the public safety occupation nationally as part of our and what that means is we're designated at Public Safety in the same sense that police and fire Corrections and all those agencies that are considered public safety and that and we cross it's synchronize very well between those two parts of our job the lights and siren side of the world and working with our partners on the streets and in the in the emergency and why that's also important it's an emergency preparedness and our relationship with your communities whether it be police fire search and rescue all the emergency preparedness and Public Safety side of things so we transition obviously clinically through our care through the health side of things but we transition to the public safety very well and a lot of people want to Pigeon holes into those one or the other but we're actually quite comfortable navigating between the two and it's actually always the way better it's more a challenge for a lot of other people than us so all that stuff is why you see us talking to municipalities about four years ago I really identified when I came into this role as president that we didn't have the relationship that we used to with the municipalities and local governments and that's a product of a lot of things going back to the early 2010 when we were put into the provincial Health Service authority and we diverged our relationship with the in emergency preparedness and Emergency Management so Flash Forward from that time to the heat Dome and we all remember that in late June of 2021 and early July and that was really a culminating point in bchs where quite frankly we lost over 700 people in this province to the heat Dome and leading up to the heat Dome the BC Ambulance Service never opened up an EOC they never did any real preparation and this isn't me saying this is what the public said the media said and to a point where the response or lack of the response of BC ambulance was questioned publicly and also by the government within two weeks on July 14th the government announced significant advancements and changes to the bchs and with Direction including things like reinstating the Emergency Management division within bchs some change it to the government adding a BCS board all these things that were done in the July 14th and the July and December 3rd announcements of 2021 that put us on a path to recovery we're not there yet but you guys are well known about the history and the challenge that we've had over the last couple years I can say with certainty over the last six months that with the work we've done through bargaining and getting a strong Collective Agreement has really allowed us to put a foundation to move ahead with some of our Recruitment and challenges and resource issues and training and all these sorts of things and another role that Kelly has and Sherman have is they were key parts of our bargaining team that were able to help us negotiate this Collective Agreement that is helping us so that's all sort of the history stuff but why we this is really about building those relationships and continuing the relationship with you guys and how we can work better with our partners in the municipal government and you know that ambulance services and health part of the responsibility of the provincial government under the Ministry of Health and ultimately bcehs but what it does is impact your citizens and your community and it impacts your resources like your fire your your Public Safety police resources and our challenges end up defaulting to those agencies and ultimately the citizens of Squamish in the district if they don't get the care and they need and that so what we do is I've put together a few buckets that we can discuss and where we can work together and the key one that I is really about resources one of the key ones is about resources in your community we've been fortunate through those announcements that the government did that a number of resources have been added in the in the sea disguise Corridor including a second 24-hour full-time ambulance into Squamish so we have two 24-hour full-time ambulances um that hasn't added resources in Commerce because it's we always had two ambulances one was just a call-out ambulance under that precarious model but they have added resources in Whistler and Pemberton but the I can tell you with assurance that we need to add significant resources to meet the demands of the house sound and Squamish area you know the growth that you're seeing in taxes that and that and the Hospital resources are diminished our inter-facility transfers put a lot of pressure on taking Resorts out of your community and it's not unique to your area but as you know the challenge is with you and we have significant volume in the community North to you that can pull resources out and same with the city we see this in a lot of communities and I don't know if you're aware of the tragic events that went on last summer with in Ashcroft and barrier and recently in the cost where those were a direct result of not having ambulances in our community that were pulled into another community and we see this around all the urban centers and it's happening in your Valley and it's one of the beauties of our system that we don't we don't have boundaries but when you're understaffed in other areas are under resourced and you pull resources out of communities that puts your patients at risk as well as the interfacility transfers can wear them so what we need to do is arm you with the tools or support you to ask the right questions why the resources are not at the level to meet you so we know every year six percent of the we add six percent call volume in communities um and under the July 14th announcement last year the minister of Health announced that in urban and Metro areas which you guys would fall under the urban model the expectation is to meet the national benchmarked where you where ninety percent of the time in the highest Acuity costs are red and purple so those are the most serious calls we code each level of call and it's just how we prioritize our calls but the Hyatt security call it's a heart attack the cardiac arrest the serious motor vehicle accident all that are considered the highest of the two categories so in ninety percent of the time the National Standard is you should get to those calls in 8.59 minutes on average now we know that that's not gonna 8.59 minutes when you're meeting in an emergency situation as an eternity we know that in Cardiac Arrest muscle dies after three minutes so it's not that it's the optimum that's the National Land Park and he committed that when I say he the minister of Health committed that would be the expectations unfortunately those measures have not been put in place yet um so we're keeping the pressure on and that's an area we can work with you to Lobby to get the appropriate level resources for your community and your patients ultimately and also to support you with ensuring that you have the right resources in your health facility the squamous General Hospital and we can you know a Lobby for expanded coverage there and needs that are met we don't have Advanced life support pru Response Unit in Squamish would be another great resource to add so there's a lot of areas we can help you Lobby for that the other key area is working to better with the municipalities around Emergency Management the direction was that we would Institute a new division of Emergency Management back into the ambulance service that's been put in place but the relationship has not went back to where when we know that when we have a bus crash a major incident heat domes or environmental flooding which we're going to see this year we know that working and planning together with our municipalities in emergency management is key to responding to these incidents and the ambulance service hasn't been at the table for a long time in those areas and that's where we can work with our leader locally our unit Chief BJ shoot and the local people so that they know when they get out to these calls or have a major incident they know who they're working with and we can prepare and plan together so resources support and adding and then the third big bucket that we really believe is it I know that it's not unique to the downtown east side it's mental health and addictions are a large workload for us and your Public Safety organizations and what that means homelessness all these areas that are challenged for response in a community we have a community Paramedic program there's only one in the house sound and it's not even filled right now and that's in Kelly's community in Pemberton and this is a program that was developed a number of years ago for Rural and remote BC to help with Community Health responses and Alternate Pathways we I met with communities all over the province and we're well situated to move this to a Metro Urban model and it could support the community wellness and these responses to addiction and mental health and that and part of these we really don't have paramedics as part of these car 67s or the mental health teams and that and they can really support those teams so that they do the Panera medic thing care side of things and so there's some conversations that we've had with the minister history of addictions and mental health about this and many communities are like Squamish are well positioned to have a support team like a community paramedic or a secondary response team that can help with these alternate Pathways whether it be Community Health addiction specialists because we know that the best plates for a lot of these people is not in the back of an ambulance an emergency department or a police car but the problem is there's no care or there's no alternate Pathways or supports generally I shouldn't say no there are there's limited and depends on the community and that ends up by default at two o'clock in the morning when somebody's having an addiction or a mental health crisis it ends up being an RCMP or a police officer and a paramedic there trying to do their best and that may not be the best unless they're needing a critical intervention so we need to make sure that we can put the support in place so that not everybody is tying up these emergency rooms so that's a lot of stuff to throw at you and what I can provide you is all the follow-up information again and really just opening up these conversations and arming you with the tools to ask the right questions to ensure that we don't download costs to the communities and I know that your budgets are just as draft as everybody else and when I started this with ambulance services and health it's part of the provincial government's mandate but it's also the responsibility I believe a communities to hold the government and bch accountable to make sure that your citizens get an ambulance in a timely fashion which unfortunately hasn't happened in every Community around this province so I'm going to leave it that I'm just going to pass over to Kelly and see if she had anything that I missed and then we'll could just high level Kelly and then we let them ask us questions

SPEAKER_08
0:18:03 (0:01:46)

thanks Troy just to follow up on that in regards to the resources that we have in Squamish we do have currently two full-time Alpha cars so it's a 24 7 resource they do day shifts they do night shifts and that is a new change we have had a one 24 7 Alpha card there for a while quite for some time now I believe it was November of 2021 that was moved from a day only car to a 24 7 resource and more recently we had a kilo call which was the pager Duty so 24 7 but it's all call out so they have a to respond to the station in a reasonable amount of time after being paged and then through covid we did have a Surge Resource there it was a 12 hour seven day week car a Juliet which was to help with mainly interested facility transfers in and out of the corridor that ended up getting sucked into Metro post so we've actually gone from three resources down to two so while having that 24 7 coverage for two of our cars is fantastic it is actually a decrease to the services provided and what's available in the community so and if one of those get sent out on an interfacility transfer down to the Lower Mainland that leaves only one resource that resources then busy tied up on a car on a call and the next closest ambulance could be Whistler as far as and unfortunately as far as get pulled down south from the corridor but they never get pushed up from the city so we don't have that overflow there is no overflow from Vancouver post because they are already over taxed in that area so Squamish ends up seeing the bread to the problem there

Eric Andersen
0:19:50 (0:00:11)

thank you for that presenting that picture Ms spudway I think we'll turn it over to council for questions if many had any questions or observations so I will go first with counselor Stoner and then to Mayor Hereford

Jenna Stoner
0:20:01 (0:00:53)

yeah thanks so much for being here and for painting the picture and continuing to provide us with updates on where we can be most successful and supportive in at our advocacy I think it's very true that the reality is that when BC ambulance is not being effectively supported and funded that it does have direct implications on our budgets because it means that the police and the firefighters are showing up so they are intertwined and we can't pull the pieces apart I have a few specific questions I was I was certain that the last time we received an update there was a good news story that the Juliet car was actually going to be maintained after the surge capacity but that sounds like that's not the case so I just want to clarify that we've lost that surge capacity yeah

SPEAKER_04
0:20:55 (0:01:28)

sorry did I get you off sorry so what happened was under the rural and remote and Indigenous framework there was a 55 additional surge resources ambulances across the province that were put in place temporarily to manage or to help with the surge capacity during covet um but the premier announced in April 2020 that those were after kova they would become permanent so last fall we started negotiating how that would impact so what happened was that we had a call-out ambulance a full-time 24-hour ambulance as Kelly mentioned plus we had a daytime Surge Resource so we had three during the day and two at night one was a call out ambulance obviously what they did was under the surge conversions under the rural and remote they converted that 24-hour call out ambulance to a full-time ambulance and took away the third ambulance during the day so it's an ad but it's sort of like what they do is say we've added all these resources but they really are conversions and definitely there's no question full time we know that holds them accountable we don't have to carry a model of on-call and we've been advocating for that but we absolutely need a third ambulance there to handle the capacity and the community resource resources so that's what happened technically it was a conversion we added full-time positions but we don't have any more physical ambulances staffed

Jenna Stoner
0:22:23 (0:00:29)

okay that's helpful um one piece of data that I think we've asked for a few times and I am just curious if you're tracking at all is how often we're left without Ambulance Service in our community so this idea that we lose cars either to the North or to the South that would be one piece for me that I think would be really helpful to know from an advocacy perspective is like really how vulnerable is our community at what percentage of the time and I don't know if that's something that is reasonable to ask of you folks

SPEAKER_04
0:22:52 (0:00:28)

well I think Kelly might have some input into this but I can tell you pchs does not provide those statistics to us for probably you can probably imagine why but I can tell you and I know Kelly and Sherman can tell you that daily we have a liability or potential liabilities where we don't see the resources in every Community including Squamish so Kelly I don't know if you want to articulate what your experience is just working up there that we see

SPEAKER_08
0:23:21 (0:01:35)

yeah and Troy said it well and that the employer bchs definitely won't provide any numbers to you and it is it is hard to determine those numbers because what happens is there always will be coverage it's just where it's coming from and how long it's going to take to get to you so that coverage may be coming from Whistler if there's only one car in Whistler both cars from Squamish are out on a call or in the city wherever they may be and there's a car available in Whistler that car will be sent from Whistler closer to Squamish so they're sitting at a cross cover point and that's how actually the salt shed on Highway 99 so it's actually taking probably about 20 minutes give or take to get to either direction there's nobody who lives there so unless there's a motor vehicle accident somewhere along the highway in between Whistler and Squamish that vehicle is of no use where it is but how do you cover two communities two very large communities with a huge population and the employers response to that is to put them in a cross-cover point another big cross cover point would be between station 255 West Vancouver and Squamish is Britannia Beach or Porto Cove is another cross cover point and well there's Community there the call volume there is not necessarily as high the call volume tends to come from West Vancouver or from Squamish not so much in between other with the exception of the motor vehicle accidents so to say Squamish is uncovered we I can't really speak to that because it's just a matter of a provincial service and where that car is coming from and how long it will take to get them to you

Eric Andersen
0:24:57 (0:00:13)

thank you Miss Broadway just moved to I'll have mayor Hereford up next just in the interest of time Mr Clifford we'll come back to you after mayor Herbert

Armand Hurford
0:25:10 (0:00:35)

yeah thank you so much for the presentation today and it was nice to hear about the sort of alignment on advocacy for expanded resources at our at our hospital and it got me to thinking around the Vancouver Coastal Health Master planning process and how you see the ambulance service engaging in that and if you have and if you feel that that's what's planned there is adequate or if you've yeah just asserted that piece so we can understand where there may be holes

SPEAKER_04
0:25:45 (0:01:21)

yeah absolutely and in our experience the ambulance service tends to be a an arm's length discussion around planning and or an afterthought that and that's partially because we're the provincial Health Service authority and each health authority has their own sort of structures and planning process and it it's siled in a lot of ways in my opinion and what it doesn't do is include so for instance when they change resources or diminish resources or they don't take into account the generally they don't take into account the added pressure on so say your CT unit's down or you don't have doctors that emerge that puts additional pressure on our resources or you know you have Critical Care patients that need so that planning when things are changed or that needs to intimately involve the transport agency that provides those services so the answer is there is not at the at the operational level I don't see a lot across this province a lot of planning that goes in together between the different organ Health authorities and or the provincial Health Services Authority that runs the ambulancers ultimately so they're definitely an area that needs to go in there and what are the implications on that then interaction between the ambulances and the health authorities and the local facilities and Community Health too

Armand Hurford
0:27:07 (0:00:29)

right yeah thank you and I just I suppose to follow up with that just and I think I know the answer I just want to get the is that at this point there's no direct point or formal point of input for the ambulance service into that Vancouver Coastal Health Master planning process we're not going to be the first part of that change We're not scheduled to be the first part of that change of taking that more holistic approach is what your is what I'm hearing you tell me right now is that correct

SPEAKER_04
0:27:36 (0:00:57)

that's our belief I don't believe that it's never been reported out that there is a overall connection to that there may be at high levels of health authority that people aren't aware of but I don't think that's effective if that's the case you know you know we talked at Whistler I think you were there at ubcm just around the lack of family physicians and the impact that puts on communities and the resources in the community not just ambulance services is incredible and you know those are areas that we need to work together on as Community response teams and part of the community health and paramedics and the ambulance service tends to be a an afterthought or a secondary thought oh we should have talked to them and I think that we need to be in that conversation on the front lines operationally how it impact patient care and the citizens as opposed to an afterthought and that's generally our experiences I think thank you

Eric Andersen
0:28:34 (0:00:04)

councilor pettingle did I see your hand did you have a question

Chris Pettingill
0:28:38 (0:00:07)

I think maybe it's better it's maybe a council discussion item for later so I'll withhold it thank

Eric Andersen
0:28:45 (0:00:55)

you um well then I'll just wrap up by expressing thanks to MS budway MR Hillier Mr Clifford thank you for taking this initiative and for your orientation regarding your organization and your profession this is very timely we have as Council not only the opportunity as do the public to participate in the upcoming Vancouver Coastal Health public engagement and master planning process but also we have our local MLA that we can work with to direct questions through the spending estimate sessions of the house and your theme has been advocacy and you've offered some tools and pictures to for us to help us to pose the right questions and we're very appreciative of this once again thank you for a very interesting presentation

SPEAKER_04
0:29:40 (0:00:14)

thank you very much on behalf of our team and if any questions come up you have our contacts and we can definitely answer them or if you want further supports we're definitely and we'll follow up with those resources just so you have those tools to move ahead

- Squamish Community Foundation Annual Report - Community Grants
0:29:57 (0:38:49)

[4508] Karen Clark from Squamish Community Foundation discussed the history of yearly donations to the foundation, including the 2022 Community Enhancement Grant process and the recipients. [4510] The grant application and dispersal process went smoothly, with 26 applications received and checks dispersed in December and January. Recipients represented various populations, including seniors, children and youth, physical and mental health, social well-being, and vulnerable populations. For 2023, there are more environmental and sustainability applications, as well as programming for vulnerable and low-income families. Selected programming included Open Door Health Under One Roof Primary Care Clinic, the Squamish Cricket Club, and the See the Sky Community Services food skills for families program. The budget for funding allocation will be decided by the foundation. The committee has a scoring matrix for grant cycle, but some members suggest increasing transparency in decision-making. [4516] There are questions about securing funding sources for a Health Service project, and the council is curious about increases in funding envelopes. [4519] Council approved two agreements, the Squamish Arts agreement and a sorca agreement, for the one percent funding despite tax revenue uncertainty because of the pandemic with unassigned grant money for the next two years. [4521] The committee is open to making its decision-making process public and seeking new members. [4522] There were discussions about clarifying grant applications, permissive tax exemptions, and the status of in-kind grants. [4532] The speaker supported the funding suggestions and timing discussions, with consideration of input from Council, while ensuring that everything is in place for an effective process during the upcoming renewal. The meeting ends with thanks to the presenters, a reminder about the upcoming vital signs report and positive feedback to the Squamish Community Foundation for its efforts.

Eric Andersen
0:29:55 (0:01:03)

very good thank you um Council were due for another presentation from our staff member Sarah Morris arts and culture manager and from guest Karen Clark the executive director of the Commerce Squamish Community Foundation are we ready to proceed to pres the presentation very good then and this is a presentation on the Squamish Community Foundation annual report and Community grants when you're ready

SPEAKER_09
0:30:58 (0:02:00)

hi everyone as mentioned I'm Karen Clark from the Squamish Community Foundation I'm the executive director there and I would like to thank mayor and Council for the opportunity to speak today about the 2022 Community enhancement Grant process and a little bit about the recipients as well as some observations that we made in 2023. just a little bit about the Squamish Community Foundation so we've been around since 2004. we were established by a group of like-minded community citizens who were business people as well as representing many organizations in town and we received donations each year from Individual organizations and corporate donors in turn we provide those invested donations to the community to local non-profit organizations and individuals during our annual grants process every year and that's the disbursements that are made from the Investments that we make every year so we've been doing that since 2004. two non-profits and Charities that work in areas such as culture health and the environment we also run the neighborhood small grants program and other granting opportunities right now we're running the Recovery Fund which is a Federal grant funds that are supporting covid recovery for non-profit organizations and lastly you may have heard we're right in the middle of a vital signs process and we're hoping to produce that report at the end of May this year so to date we've distributed almost 1 million in funding to community nonprofits yeah sorry oh do you need me there you go okay we'll

SPEAKER_00
0:32:59 (0:00:00)

get this straight

SPEAKER_09
0:32:59 (0:14:12)

here so the applications have to show some element that they support the official community plan and I'm sure you're familiar with those parts of the goals of the official community plan so the application the Grant application and dispersal process went very smoothly in 2022 it was our second round ing the grants and they opened in September they closed about six weeks later in November 12 2021 the grant dispersal committee which is a committee of about seven or eight folks we try to bring in as many different populations and people from different groups and towns we've got some youth representation senior representation lgbtq and different populations in town that sit on the committee so we continually strive to make that committee diverse and so they deliberated and then made decisions on December 7th and checks were dispersed The District staff approved the decisions and then checks were dispersed and December and January 2022 and then programming ran throughout 2022. so we had a great collaboration again with Squamish arts and we did the promotion together as well as held a town hall on October 20th and yeah I mean we do we do advertising on Facebook and on our website as well so from that we receive 26 applications in 2022 one application was redirected back to Squamish arts and another was redirected back to the district of Squamish because it was for event traffic control and then we had two applications from Sea to Sky community service you can see some of the populations and areas of interest that came in through the applications there so we had quite a few so remember this was during covid so we had quite a high number of physical and mental health and social well-being applications for seniors programming and Children and Youth were kind of at the top there for 2022 in 2023 so I've been asked to just touch briefly we just have finished the process for the 2023 applications so just a note that the applications that we were applied this year so we received 31 applications they went up in 2023 and it was about the same amount of money that was applied for though but generally the areas of interest that were slightly different there was a higher number of environmental stewardship and sustainability applications in 2023 and quite a few more vulnerable and low-income families that programming that was applied for but the same yes so the funding requested in total was around two hundred and seventy thousand dollars which is considerably more than what we have to fund which is around 98 000 so that was the same for these last two years so as far as the grant criteria and scoring go all applications have to meet at least one of these types of programming so that's decolonization reconciliation intergenerational programming neighborhood connectivity environmental stewardship Equity diversity and inclusion physical health Mental Health social well-being youth-led initiatives programming for vulnerable populations and Recreation programming there are nine other criteria that they have to meet on the application some of those include Clarity of project goals and activities the degree to which Community groups partner and collaborate the degree to which the official community plan goals are supported and how the project Fosters Community involvement this year we weighted the criteria and so any given question could be worth between three and five points which seemed to work quite well for the committee so here you can see the results of the dispersal meeting that we had and the Squamish River Watershed Society was seem to be number one there and then Squamish Helping Hands Under One Roof they receive the most amount of funding they were third and Squamish climate Action Network was second the Squamish off-road Cycling Association ran a program that was the youth First Nation mountain bike program and they received one of the higher amounts of funding along with the house down Women's Center drop-in programming and then the rest sort of search and rescue there had applied for flashing lights for their emergency vehicle so that's what that little bit of higher amount of funding there as well so yeah and as you can see there's the total amount of funding that was dispersed in 2022 so I'll just give you a brief view of some of the applications so here we have the open door Health Under One Roof Primary Care Clinic once again they were they received the ten thousand dollars in funding so they opened their clinic in February 2022 to vulnerable folks who previously did not have a physician with access to Primary Care in a location where they can comfortably and easily see the doctors so the clinic is right at Helping Hands there's three local Physicians involved in that project and they now have 148 patients and they see folks for common conditions such as wound care Foot Care STD testing improved medication management medical attention diagnostic testing and they are able to improve access to treatment to detox and much more so there's quite a bit of success with this clinic and they're anecdotally the Squamish General Hospital is reporting a decrease in visits to the emergency room by the Clinics of the patients or by the patients of the clinic so yeah and then there's a little quote down there at the bottom our next project is the Squamish Cricket Club they just started up in 2022 and there's a nice little part of this project which is encapsulated in that first quote there and it says Squamish is a changing community and there has been an increase in cultural diversity which should be celebrated the Squamish Cricket Club has potential of being one of those channels to bring together people locals and newcomers to Canada like through the medium of sport so yeah that's a pretty neat little part of that project and so they ended up purchasing some equipment and a temporary playing service they were applying for a permanent playing surface but we did not have the money that was necessary for that so we were able to help them with that they have 48 members now and they've played a few games and they have four local sponsors so that's them and then the Squamish River Watershed Society outreach program so they were the number one program that received the highest amount of points and they've been around for a long time running this program it's five days of school programming in different local parks and one day at for the public at Judd Beach so they reached about 375 students from grades kindergarten to six and that's mostly a release and education around a release of coho salmon in education around that and then the public event had 220 people coming out to celebrate and they released 40 000 co-hosts so lots of great work going on there the nice thing about this project is the amount of volunteers they have that are really dedicated to the program and show up for you know a lot of the classes and whatnot and they have a nice partnership with the Tenderfoot Creek Hatchery as well as the men's shed for and they create those wooden salmon cutouts for them so then we have the a couple of programs so the programs and funding don't always go quite as planned so there's a couple of examples here of that so the Squamish Environmental Conservation Society they're bird friendly Squamish program they applied for quite a an amount of money which we weren't able to give them but we did give them some which they were able to work with but the their ability to get volunteers together and make the kinds of observations that they wanted to make wasn't quite there so however they were able to log 85 observations and then they did find some dead birds that at a particular location the Four Winds apartment building on the manquam blind Channel and there they were able to see that the birds were hitting the glass railing there so in the long run the solution to that is to put up applications on the glass railing their like stickers to stop the birds from going there so the problem with this project was that by the time they were done making all the observations it was too cold to get the stickers up on the glass railing so they're going to be doing that this spring so they're a little bit behind schedule and the one other thing that I wanted to note about that program was that the Four Winds building was amenable to them having volunteers there and doing the research but they had quite a bit of trouble getting other buildings to participate in the program so it sounds like there's a bit of Education that needs to be done still if we want to have a bird friendly community and then just a quick note on the Squamish Senior Center Society they ran a number of their events but weren't able to run all of them due to covid-19 restrictions in early 2022. so the oh we're back come back to this one yeah no problem so this there we go see the sky Community Services food skills for families program great cooking education program they ran three sessions one with a healthy pregnancy outreach program where 12 perinatal mothers participated another with the Farmers Market nutrition program or 12 families participated and then their last program and they're about eight sessions each where they cook together they learn together and they eat together they had that was a seniors program and they had 12 seniors involved in that program a few more of the Squamish Minor Hockey Association received some funding to supplement registration fees for the Youth that participate in the sport and they saw after covid they saw quite an interest in hockey and there was an uptick in the amount of players and the amounts of female participation in hockey this year and lastly there's the better at home luncheon learns for seniors you've seen this one before so they ran some new presentations in 2022 with the Alzheimer's society and then they had some cross-cultural conversations the Ceta Sky Hospice Society ran a volunteer program they had 17 volunteers which is a great number for them they're really happy with how many volunteers that they've got with them now and then finally just some observations over the course of the last few years and things that we want to keep working on we'll continue to review and update and improve the application and guidelines this year we're hoping to clearly State how much how um how much funds are available for the entire community so you know it's ninety eight thousand dollars we do say that but we just want to make that a bit more clear and we're going to make recommended budget request limits so we often get applications that ask for a lot of money that just isn't going to work with how much we have so we're just going to make it easier on everybody and recommend 15 000 as a maximum to apply for and that also comes as a request from applicants too that they that we give them those numbers so we're hoping to work with the district to establish more clarity around how many applications in an organization can put in as you saw see the sky put in a couple of applications for different programs but we just want a little bit more clarity around that we're also looking for more clarity around organizations who are already receiving permissive tax exemptions and their eligibility for Community enhancement grants as well as more clarity for facility rental dos facility rental requests or we'll keep discussing what we had this year we had quite a few applications for facility rental requests which has been different in the other year so we're just looking for a clear process for that so I'd like to thank the District of Squamish for the opportunity to administer Minister the grants again and we'd also like to thank you for offering this type of support to the community each year

Eric Andersen
0:47:11 (0:00:37)

thank you very much Council any questions for our guests I do have one maybe I'll start off perhaps this question for Ms Morris in the activity chart under the grant summary report districts District District staff approved Grant dispersal recommendations offered by the foundation could you describe further what kind of considerations you're applying or what kind of evaluation criteria you are bringing on behalf of the district for that exercise

SPEAKER_01
0:47:49 (0:00:33)

thank you chair this is a requirement of the community Grant policy and staff review the report from the Community Foundation and also Squamish arts any for anything that legal or legislative parameters that maybe we shouldn't be granting maybe a commercial business or something that doesn't meet our policy requirements and the CAO and the CFO are part of the review and the CAO is the ultimate Authority on proving that report

Eric Andersen
0:48:23 (0:00:09)

thank you counselor Stoner oh ex I missed counselor pettingell please go ahead oh counselor pending gold

Chris Pettingill
0:48:33 (0:00:18)

thank you chair I just had a question about the open door Health Under One Roof Primary Care Clinic and just an understanding if that Grant was the whole of their funding or is that just a Top-Up or a piece of what they required

SPEAKER_09
0:48:52 (0:00:34)

thank you counselor Pettingill it is just a piece there's a huge amount of funding that's necessary for that Primary Care Clinic and I've just heard that they've received quite an a bit of funding recently for this year but um yeah I guess there's you know a thought that is covered by the provincial health authority but very little of it is they are definitely in partnership with them but they need to find external funding and yeah I don't know the amount but yes this was this was just a small portion

Chris Pettingill
0:49:26 (0:00:36)

okay thanks chair if I could maybe leave a comment then I guess I'm mostly glad to hear that but it does strike me as like such a valuable incredible project but it's also a core fundamental Health Service that I'm not sure we should be funding from Community enhancer grants I wouldn't want to do something that sees it go away but maybe this is a piece that we need some advocacy on and so just kind of want to flag that this is one that jumped out at me as maybe not a community enhancement Grant thing exactly just so fundamental and important as a Health Service

Eric Andersen
0:50:03 (0:00:03)

counselor stoner

Jenna Stoner
0:50:06 (0:00:38)

thank you through the chair thanks for the presentation and for all the work a few questions the program has always been very over subscribed even when it was done internally but we have the policy says up to one percent of General Taxation and that is more than 98 000 so I'm just curious if I don't think I see Finance staff but maybe Miss Morris can speak to this about the last time that we increased that funding envelope and when we might want to consider that's obviously a council decision at budget but if we've given any thought to that discussion

SPEAKER_01
0:50:45 (0:00:58)

thank you through the chair so that one percent includes multiple agreements so there is the Squamish Arts agreement for the arts and culture Grant as well as an agreement with sorca that live under that one percent of funding at the time that these agreements were entered into we were in the middle of the pandemic and it was unclear where taxation Revenue was going at that point and so we decided Council decided that the agreements would be set at the same rate for the duration however there is room within that Grant envelope that hasn't been assigned currently for the next two years we can provide details of that through Finance for council's consideration should they wish to increase the amount to the recipients I think we're a little bit late for 2023 but maybe rolling that over and providing that in 2024

Jenna Stoner
0:51:43 (0:00:23)

that's helpful thank you for that context and then just a few other operational questions I am curious if the scoring Matrix that grants are assessed against is publicly available as well as the composition of the committee and if there's any structure around how frequently those seats change over in the process for filling them

SPEAKER_09
0:52:07 (0:00:49)

thank you counselor stoner the scoring Matrix is available we show what all the questions are in the guidelines and then there it showed the waiting of the each individual question so yes and then as far as the committee it's it could be public it's not public information right now but it could totally be put somewhere where who it is and it does change and people sort of come and go we have a sort of a large grants committee and with each granting cycle some people can participate and others can't and we're constantly seeking new members as well and just kind of are trying to keep it diverse as possible was there are you recommending that we make it public

Jenna Stoner
0:52:56 (0:01:14)

I'm not sure if I have a specific recommendation at this point I was just curious think I think I given how it can somewhat be a little bit fluid in terms of who sits there it might be tricky to keep it up to date but I do think having some visibility on who's making the decision it's one of the things that we considered when we did transfer this from being an open discussion around the council table is to another entity is what is the visibility that the community has in terms of how that money gets allocated and who's making those decisions so it might be something to think about and if there's like any specific reasons as to not then I'm happy to hear them but it's just something that jumped to mine and then my last question was going to be around the last question that you raised on your slide of the in-kind requests and I know that this is something that maybe we didn't give folsomes thought to when we did create the policy and I guess a question to staff of like have we started to contemplate how we start to address that because I suspect we've kind of created two tiers where there's people who are coming to ask the district for in-kind support on top of the community enhancement grants and how do we start to marry those processes together

SPEAKER_01
0:54:10 (0:00:33)

thank you um through the chair it is an Ever evolving conversation however staff are looking at a solution to this particular I was going to say problem but challenge for 2020 for I guess we're doing the grants agreement renewal next year and so contemplating these challenges will be part of that and a broader policy update potentially

SPEAKER_09
0:54:44 (0:00:36)

I just wanted to think counselor Stoner just wanted to respond to your thought there about the making the members of the committee public there's just some thoughts maybe around privacy they're around you know there's people adjudicating grants and whatnot and I'm not sure yeah what if there's responses and people have questions and whatnot they should all technically come through me as the administrator of the grant so yeah that might be one reason why we wouldn't so I just wanted to say that for a thought yeah

Eric Andersen
0:55:20 (0:00:03)

for the questions Council counselor French

John French
0:55:24 (0:00:26)

thanks chair and I think this is more for staff the observations slide has requests for some specific bits of feedback from Council so I'm wondering should we expect this to come back to us or should we contemplate some kind of motion that directs this any thoughts and guides you have on that would be helpful

SPEAKER_01
0:55:50 (0:00:57)

thank you counselor French there is not if I want to go through point I guess the first suggestion to limit the cap of funding there's nothing that precludes the Community Foundation from doing that in their agreement or in the policy and so that could be put in place I think what we were trying to achieve today was socializing that with Council to see if there were any objections to that and then with the other suggestions here and we would want to maybe formalize that through policy upon the policy renewal and agree agreement renewal and so if council do have Direction on those amendments then that would be great to have that formalized through emotion thank you

Eric Andersen
0:56:48 (0:00:42)

I have a question regarding the companies or organizations which use the services of the Squamish Community Foundation to disperse monies and I'm thinking of the example of squamous terminals if I'm not mistaken they're utilizing or have the Community Foundation as an arms length vehicle for them to assist in dispersing project money in the community is that a separate administered separately or is that activity on behalf of squamous terminals or other partners reflected in the summary report and activity plan we had before us

SPEAKER_09
0:57:30 (0:00:20)

thank you counselor Anderson it is a separate process so we run an annual grants process which is actually coming up soon every year and it is focused on our endowment funds and the interest that's made off of those each year is what makes our annual grants so it's a separate process

Eric Andersen
0:57:51 (0:00:42)

thank you see no other questions I'll offer one more and then I'll go to Mayor Hereford we have other agencies in the corridor who offer Community grants Worcester black home wood fiber LNG as well do you have liaison with them or do you compare notes as regards priority fields or gaps that might be covered in themes or areas of project interest for example do you compare notes with them so that we maybe are addressing grants or addressing gaps if you like and learning from each other as regards Administration

SPEAKER_09
0:58:33 (0:00:28)

thank you councilor Anderson I you know I have chatted with wlng not so much Whistler black home but I think that's a great suggestion typically we receive the applications and go from there and adjudicate based on our criteria but it's yeah and you know I definitely see what they're granting to and who in our community is also receiving funding through those grants so yeah

Armand Hurford
0:59:01 (0:01:57)

thank you mayor Herford yeah thank you and thank you so much for the presentation today and for all the work that I know that it takes to administer this and it's great to see the positive impact on the community I I'm gonna go to the to the observation slide and I think I'm happy to hear that um that Max funding piece is something that you could the foundation could do with their discretion and I totally think that's appropriate and i would support your whatever number you came up with that you felt would help you in your in your process and would help the applicants understand the context of the process so I think that's fine and you know the other three points I think deserve some work and I'd like to have those discussions um in my vision would be that those would roll into the to the update so we have a bit of time to do that I don't it think they're just feels with the timeline for the renewal that seems like a natural a natural fit so and I think each one deserves its own debate I can see pros and cons already I can hear some of this debate already as we see it so I would look forward to seeing that but I don't have a position on any of those three at this point except that recognizing they're gonna they do deserve some consideration but I think the timing piece I think it can be a later piece um with this except for maybe this facilities rental one because I think there might maybe that's the first one but I look forward to seeing staff's opinion on the order that we that we tackle these pieces or prioritization but yeah but I do think that with the renewal coming that seems like the most natural fit to make sure we have everything in place so we can actually do that the most effective way thank you

Eric Andersen
1:00:59 (0:00:02)

it comes for stoner

Jenna Stoner
1:01:01 (0:00:24)

yeah just picking up on that I'm curious though if Miss Clark you're seeking some sense of direction as you go into the 2023 granting cycle or if that's already kind of you feel confident going into it and this is okay to kind of postpone to the 2024 kind of review of the policy or is there something that is a little bit more imminent here for this year's granting cycle

SPEAKER_09
1:01:26 (0:00:20)

thank you counselor Stoner so we're finished with the 2023 granting process but certainly for the 2024 process which will start up again this fall we'd be looking for some Direction

Eric Andersen
1:01:46 (0:00:18)

so excuse me see no further questions or comments from Council I will then thank our pres oh do I did I miss counselor pettingle again okay very good please proceed with your motion counselor stoner

Jenna Stoner
1:02:05 (0:00:20)

let me just make sure I get my wording right here so I would like to put a motion on the floor that direct staff to bring back a discussion on a review of the community Grant policy by the fall of 2023 I won't put a timeline on it Givens Miss Morris's wide eyes

SPEAKER_01
1:02:25 (0:00:44)

thank you if counselor Stoner I may the Community Foundation and Squamish Arts start to initiate the grant process as early as October so we would be looking to have those policy amendments in place prior to that and give those organizations a window of time to update or Implement their materials I think that Council can direct staff to work on it at an early on an earlier timeline however it could be challenging to include that in the current work plan before August

Jenna Stoner
1:03:10 (0:00:11)

so it's not currently in staff's work plan for this year before okay I will take my motion back for the moment

Eric Andersen
1:03:21 (0:00:04)

very good counselor French do you have a something to offer at this time

John French
1:03:26 (0:00:18)

or had counselor Stoner carried on I would have seconded I get where she's at so I'll just hang out well counselors Wheels turns

Eric Andersen
1:03:44 (0:00:05)

very good then chair councilor pettingo

Chris Pettingill
1:03:49 (0:00:22)

yeah I just wonder if Miss Morris has a suggestion or comprise Clarity then if you know given the short timelines and some outstanding questions which it sounds like might require some Council input how we might address those given the timelines and all the constraints we're facing

SPEAKER_01
1:04:12 (0:01:28)

okay thank you through the chair so for the issue on more than one Grant application I think the Community Foundation are just looking for clarity in terms of organizations that are larger in the community such as the Sea to Sky School District 48 or CSI community services that have multiple applications but maybe not for the same program if Council are okay with that and then moving on into the permissive tax exemptions there's nothing legislatively that requires or precludes us if I'm not mistaken please jump in CFO that I'm aware of and so I believe that currently the Community Foundation have been accepting grants from those organizations that do receive ptes and just looking for clarity again from Council on whether that's acceptable in the granting program and then on the last piece I think that's going to take the bulk of the work for staff because we need to either decide whether these in-kind grants um remain within our grant program or if they're taken out or if there's another stream that they go through so that final one is going to be the bulk of the work in what we're looking at

Chris Pettingill
1:05:40 (0:00:53)

today so if I could follow up chair and I thank you just on the first one for example the more than one application I vaguely recall that maybe it was in a different context that there was a conversation about not supporting multiple applications with the idea of part of what we're trying to do here is build general capacity in the community and so when we spread out these things more we're sort of supporting more organizations to do more work and so I don't know where we end up on that and so I guess it's that sort of thing are you looking then for direction that we can just leave that up to staff or is there a mechanism for Council to sort of give some thought to some of these things or

Eric Andersen
1:06:34 (0:00:02)

customer

Jenna Stoner
1:06:37 (0:00:54)

you think I'm hearing a mix of both I think they're hoping that we might be able to provide some high-level feedback today but I think one of the challenges is that this might require a little bit more deliberation on so I don't know if I said it those two particular questions come back to council for future committee the whole discussion to provide some more nuanced feedback for me the like second piece around organizations already receiving permissive tax exemptions I think the bigger concern to me are those that have partnering agreements so a portion of the community enhancement grants are already going to Circa so that's a like a really valuable program but that we added another seven and a half thousand dollars into circuit programming is a flag for me that I hadn't quite thought through when we initiated this policy so those are the pieces that I'm don't think we're fully equipped to have the conversation around the table today and maybe Miss glende can help

Eric Andersen
1:07:31 (0:00:04)

me

SPEAKER_00
1:07:36 (0:00:28)

thank you chair what I would recommend is that staff and go away can go away and look at the possibility of where this discussion would happen it may be that it doesn't affect the granting until 2025 and that's just the reality of the staff work plan and the agendas that we have but rather than try and have the discussion on the Fly we can come back with a recommendation certainly through agenda planning and with staff work plans

Eric Andersen
1:08:05 (0:01:03)

thank you any final comments questions Council then it remains for me to thank our presenters Karen Clark and Sarah Morris I noted that the Miss Clark you mentioned that the vital signs report will be out in a month or two I know a few of my colleagues as well as myself participate in some of those sessions they were very busy active and well received another Squamish Community Foundation involvement and contribution thank you very much for today I'm sure that we've taken some good notes and we'll come back regarding some of the observations that you've left us with thank you mayor Hereford do we have a second Earth counselor Stoner any opposed then motion carried and we'll we're off to our next gig thank you very much

- Motion to terminate
1:08:46 (0:00:21)

The council meeting discussed the plans for a new community center. The center will be built on the outskirts of town and will include a gym, meeting rooms, and a small snack bar. The estimated cost of the project is $3 million and will be funded through a combination of public grants and private fundraising. The council also discussed the need for better public transportation in the area and suggested exploring the possibility of a new bus route that would connect the community center to other parts of town. Additionally, concerns were raised about the impact of the center on the environment and the need for eco-friendly building materials to be used. The meeting concluded with a decision to proceed with the project and to form a committee to oversee its construction and operation.