Committee of the Whole - 11 Apr 2023


1: Welcome to the Squamish Nation Traditional Territory
2: ADOPTION OF AGENDA
3: MOTION TO CLOSE
4: STAFF REPORTS
4.i: Visitor and Camping Management 2022 Update
4.ii: Cheekeye Fan Development and Debris Flow Mitigation Update
iii: 2023 District of Squamish Housing Needs Report
5: MOTION TO CLOSE
6: TERMINATION
- Staff Reports: Visitor & Camping Management 2022 Update
0:00:00 (0:54:44)

[4806] At the council meeting, Megan Latimer presented the 2022 visitor management end of season report. Squamish has seen a rise in visitors during recent summers with issues related to human waste, garbage, and destruction of sensitive wildlife habitat. Communication, education, and enforcement are necessary tools for mitigating the growing impacts of high seasonal visitation. The report proposes two resolutions to council, to receive the visitor and camping management plan for 2022 and to open the municipal campground for events only from May until July 2023 and for recreational and child care programming from July until September 2023. [4811] Staff wants to gather more data in order to better understand the impact of certain policy options ahead of the 2023 budget cycle. [4816] Another speaker inquired about fines enforcement and the ability to scale enforcement quickly in relation to workers who might camp or move ahead without housing plans. [4817] Bylaw staff will monitor the impacts of workers using campgrounds as temporary residences. [4821] A speaker requested elaboration on the monitoring of specific forest service roads. [4822] The Ministry of Environment collects data through traffic counters deployed on certain roads, and there is a desire for an additional counter on Ring Creek Forest Service Road. [4823] Another speaker asked if discussion is being advanced about the Refuse Creek site as a potential location on Crown Land to support the council's advocacy over the last couple of years. [4827] A suggestion was made to explore the possibility of opening up the municipal campground to visitors during high volume weekends for a cost recovery basis. [4837] The director of operations discussed the need to include budget costs for the 2024 cycle to build an event-only or municipal campground site. [4850] A speaker expressed concerns about capacity issues during the busy months of July and August and inquired about alternate plans for event organizers. [4855] The district deploys porta-potties throughout the community and has plans to rebuild the washrooms at Junction Park. [4856] Another speaker proposed using the campground for child programming during fall and winter and outdoor education programs during colder months. [4857] The park aims to expand their programming in the fall but faces difficulty due to limited staff and contractor resources. [4878] The original motion for the campground resolution was amended to include weekend-only childcare programming from May to the end of September for seasonality of the campground in 2023. [4880] The council passed a motion for weekend-only childcare programming until three or five o'clock in the afternoon, including Friday night special events. [4884] The Municipal Campground is a valuable asset for community events and childcare use. [4886] Another speaker advocated for providing ample parking and camping opportunities to prevent a situation like that on Hastings Street from occurring in Squamish during Squamish Days Logger Sports weekend. [4888] The council supports scaling enforcement efforts, the long weekend event camping throughout the summer, and the current resolution with consideration for more discussion on the topic of housing. [4889] The motion to support childcare access and access to camping was passed, and the next order of business was discussing the chikai fan development and debris flow mitigation update.

SPEAKER_05
0:00:01 (0:00:49)

23. welcome to the unseated territories of the Squamish Nation I am Lauren Greenlaw councilor Lauren Greenlaw acting as mayor chairing this meeting can I get an adoption of the agenda well but we didn't do it in this one though you haven't done it in the open yet we did do it okay well okay well then we'll move to our first order of business which is visitor and camping management update from staff

SPEAKER_10
0:00:51 (0:15:21)

good morning mayor and Council my name is Megan Latimer I'm the general manager of Public Safety with the district my pronouns are she and hers and you may address me accordingly this morning we are here to discuss the 2022 visitor management end of season report the purpose of this presentation is to provide counsel with updates including benchmarking data and recommendations regarding education enforcement activities related to visitor and camping Management in 2022 and to seek Direction regarding the future use of the municipal Campground so for some backgrounds Squamish has seen an increase in visitors every summer over recent years with a significant surge during the covid-19 pandemic years in 2021 and 2022 the district began collecting data on visitor impacts including bylaw complaints and issues found by Community Patrol officers RCMP calls for service fire department responses to Camp fires low availability on the campsite availability calendar reports from tourism squamishes destination stewards and from vehicle counts on Forest Service Roads used to access recreational destinations While most visitors are respectful some Behavior as well as the growing volume of visitors leads to environmental impacts for example human waste garbage destruction sensitive wildlife habitat and emergency concerns including search and rescue needs and Wildfire risk communication education enforcement are widely regarded as necessary tools to help mitigate the growing impacts of high seasonal visitation in the community to help manage visitor impacts during the summer season in 2021 District staff developed the visitor and camping management plan which includes policy strategies in the form of amendments to three bylaws the camping traffic and parked use bylaws to better mitigate impacts in sensitive areas during key Seasons as well as non-policy components of the plan including formation of a visitor management Roundtable with external stakeholders hiring a seasonal visitor management coordinator addition of public amenities and enhanced public education resources for Frontline staff for example handouts developed for by our Communications team for bylaw enforcement RCMP conservation officer service Squamish nation and tourism Squamish staff to distribute this presentation focuses mainly on the non-policy aspects of the plan which were developed to support those policy components as in previous years the key questions guiding the collection of data throughout the visitor management season were as follows we looked at what are the issues so the issues of concern we looked at where are the issues the areas of concern and we also looked at how often they're happening so the frequency and patterns of behaviors in terms of the issues of concern in 2022 as in previous Seasons visitor related complaints to bylaw enforcement during the summer were focused mainly on camping and unsanctioned areas during the 2022 visitor season the following key issues were also identified management of human waste Wildlife attractants mainly garbage and illegal campfires these issues are Illustrated in the chart before you which shows an increase in complaints about these issues throughout the summer months in terms of areas of concern camping infractions and complaints were distributed throughout Squamish similarly to 2021 in both seasons the downtown drew the most complaints and infractions followed by the Industrial Park area which includes the spit Road there was a reduction in complaints in most other areas most notably the manquam forest service road that being said the volume of traffic on the mancom forest service road as picked up by traffic counters continues to be very high with over 1100 vehicles on the July and August long weekends indicating that camping and other activities may be pushed beyond the boundaries of the district further up that road as the visitor management work continues for another season it'll be important to continue to document and review these different trends in terms of hot spots where unsanctioned camping was occurring the downtown continued to be the main area followed by the industrial park as well as brackendale there were fewer complaints received during the 2022 season compared to 2021 which staff believe can partly be attributed to the proactive education engagement work of both the bylaw Community Patrol officers as well as other organizations in the community like the destination stewards from tourism Squamish when we look at frequency and patterns of behavior as in 2021 illegal camping infractions increased in frequency throughout the summer this figure illustrates the rising trend of illegal camping over the summer months and as mentioned in the last slide compared to 2021 it appears there were fewer instances reported in terms of complaint in 2022. I wanted to touch on the Squamish visitor management Roundtable which was established in 2021 with the intention of bringing all agencies conducting business and Squamish that deal with tourism and visitor traffic to share ideas and issues provide resources and solutions and ultimately mitigate the strain of high volumes of visitation and illegal camping during the summer months this group meets bi-weekly between June and October and then monthly between November and May and is comprised of members from governmental and non-governmental stakeholder organizations here in our community during the 2022 visitor season the top issues that were discussed at the Squamish visitor management Roundtable included garbage human waste and Wildlife attractants left by visitors as well as unsanctioned camping both inside and outside of the District of Squamish boundary they also discussed events that bring large number of visitors to Squamish and how to manage those High occupancy and zero vacancy rates at hotels on holiday weekends in July and August some of the top tools that were discussed around the table to mitigate issues related to visitors included the closure of cat Lake in Levitt Lake due to a food condition bear ultimately this resulted in the euthanasia of that euthanization of that bear in August at cat Lake one of the other campaigns that was discussed the beginning of the visitor management season last year was the don't love it death campaign shared by tourism Squamish and I'll show you some examples of that in a moment and one of the other tools included by law enforcement patrols with the community Patrol officers which were able to be deployed for longer shifts during 2022 as well as the tourism Squamish stewards who are both educating visitors and residents around town on the benefits of respectful visitorship so awareness education enforcement tools um certainly have proved very effective in reducing unsanctioned camping in sensitive areas around the district all of the district's enforcement actions have endeavored to achieve voluntary compliance and the issuing of tickets is really a last resort method and has only been required in the minority of cases in 2022 during the peak visitor management season there were 74 complaints that were received by the bylaw office regarding unsanctioned camping about 30 percent of these were related to Wildlife attractants being left out in illegal campsites in addition Community Patrol officers were able to identify over 200 incidents of unsanctioned camping throughout the community during proactive Patrols in sensitive areas and were able to provide education information about where it is permitted to camp in Squamish the camping guide pamphlet which you see here was developed by District Communications staff with input from partner organizations at the visitor management round table and is a tool that's distributed by bylaw staff RCMP conservation officers as well as destination tourism stewards to anybody who's camping on sanctioned areas to be able to provide them with a resource of where they can find legal camping options regarding enforcement only four fines were issued under the camping bylaw related to unsanctioned camping in public spaces under the traffic bylaw there were seven fines issued for camping on a district roadway and 65 fines were issued for parking for over 72 hours in one location as well as abandoned trailers and campers and the illegal storage of campers and trailers on District roadways um oh it wasn't oh there we go to share some of the examples of messaging that was put out by both the district and Community Partners around visitor management you can see here um example of social media messaging from the district I also have the camping availability calendar which is managed by tourism Squamish it's a very helpful resource for bylaw and destination stewards to use as a tool to help visitors to find camping options I've also put an example up there from one of the partners at the visitor management Roundtable the Squamish access society which is working to educate their members on appropriate camping options within the community as mentioned previously the don't love it to death campaign was an initiative by the Cs guide destination management Council that launched in 2022 this campaign is a reminder to outdoor enthusiasts and visitors enjoying the outdoors to be mindful of the impact of their behavior and activities that are having that is happening in delicate ecosystems and communities and so they had some quite creative messaging that they came up with consultation with other members in the visitor management Roundtable staff also continue to Monitor and connect with other communities with similar visitor management profiles sorry similar visitor profiles some of these communities are piloting programs to help manage illegal camping however it should be noted that these communities also lack supportive shelter for people experiencing homelessness unlike Squamish which has the Under One Roof facility these other communities also have a significant issue with a lack of seasonal Workforce housing pilot projects include the Canmore safe part program for workers which has seen limited uptake unfortunately as well as a temporary use permit program for Summer Staff in both Tofino and ucluelet now turning to the campground which we wanted to include in this presentation the District of Squamish Middle School campgrounds operated until the fall of 2019 and then open for a short time during the covid-19 pandemic during 2022 the just sorry 2021 the district decided to open the campground only for special events however it was also used for recreational programming as needed this continued into the 2022 season for the 2023 season the municipal Campground is booked until July for events event organizers are responsible for providing all necessary supports for camping including managing sanitation and waste from July there's plans to again use the space for recreational programming including summer camps as well as potentially licensing it for a child care operator to use for fixed period the District of Squamish Brennan park fields and lands master plan also comes into effect later in 2023 and will impact the future of how the space is developed as the area is designated to be converted into a covered bike park and special events camping is planned to be moved to a different future location within the master plan despite these current commitments for the site staff have reviewed the possibility of reopening the municipal campground to individual users for camping to do so safely and responsibly the site would need to be upgraded including provision of a holding tank for sewage management in addition Staffing would be required to run the campground Recreation and Public Works staff positions assigned to the campground in previous years proved not to be adequate to keep up to Campground user demands in order to operate the campground safely camp host positions are proposed to be contracted to provide support and security 24 hours a day required site upgrade costs and estimated operating costs for the season so from the May long weekend until the September long weekend are broken down in the chart before you hear given the current commitments for event camping and initiation of the fields and Fields and lands master plan opening the campground to individual users for the 2023 season would have significant impacts to budget staff capacity as well as the district's endorsed organizational plans staff continue to discuss with the province the development of additional Recreation sites as well as expanding existing campgrounds to accommodate higher volumes of visitors in appropriate locations near Squamish in support of council's advocacy efforts in 2021 and 2022 to the ministry of environment and BC parks foreign so with that staff have proposed two recommended resolutions to council that Council received the visitor and camping management plan for 2022 um uh for information and that the council opened the municipal Campground for events only from May until July 2023 and for recreational and child care programming from July until September 2023. thank you and I will hand it back to council for any questions and discussion

SPEAKER_05
0:16:12 (0:00:05)

thank you for the presentation Council are there questions mayor Herford

Armand Hurford
0:16:18 (0:00:24)

thank you for the report in the presentation I was curious all of the data ends in September and it's on a very much on an upward trajectory at that point and I was wondering what the back do we have any information on what the what September October looks like I'm just trying to understand the curve and make sure that we're resourcing it appropriately in the in the time frames

SPEAKER_10
0:16:42 (0:00:43)

thank you through the chair so partly that is because the visitor management coordinator who collates all of this data is only employed seasonally the position is for about three days a week between May and September we do know looking at staff data from beyond that point and by law complaints in particular that this did continue well into October last year was particularly warm weather and so we did we did see lots of people still coming on weekends and impacts in the community up until well into October

Armand Hurford
0:17:26 (0:00:28)

so she should we not then be looking at an expansion of that of that role to cover off the sort of the tail end of the season a bit more so through September seems appropriate or how or not having that resource how did staff deal with that through the September time where they didn't have that resource available

SPEAKER_10
0:17:55 (0:00:57)

thank you through the chair um this was something that was considered for the 2023 budget cycle was expanding the hours of that role and the time period that being said looking at the reduction in complaints in 2022 compared to 2021 staff did feel that it was worth having another season of data collection before bringing that recommendation forward to council for an increase in hours for that staff resource and so the proposed plan is to continue to collect data this year to better understand whether 2021 was an anomaly year in terms of the demands on resources whether the impacts of the non-policy and policy options that were put forward in 2021 we're really having an effect in 2022 and then having 2023 as a data set to compare to look for

SPEAKER_05
0:18:52 (0:00:04)

trends

Chris Pettingill
0:18:57 (0:00:29)

yeah thank you a couple questions in the resolution Municipal Campground for events from May until July is that sort of daytime use only or does that include camping for those events and then similarly from July through September might there be some camping associated with recreational Child Care programming or is it you know no camping at all through either or one of those time periods

SPEAKER_10
0:19:27 (0:00:03)

through the Cheryl let Mr Hoskin answer that one

SPEAKER_03
0:19:30 (0:00:24)

thank you to the chair the they're up till July there could be some minor amounts of camping for events and sport festivals that sort of thing but after that time no there would not be any camping until a new Campground is developed and that would be more appropriate for those type of events

Chris Pettingill
0:19:54 (0:00:40)

thank you and then my second question is you know we Fortis and wood fiber scene to still be trying to move ahead without housing plans secured even if Ford is supposed to get a temporary use permit it seems that there might still be a number of workers wanting to just camp or do their own thing what is our ability to scale our enforcement adjust our fines and so on in short order like is this something we need to be preparing for now or we can sort of react if we see you know complaints really start coming in and you know impacts to vulnerable populations and our sort of desired visitors and so on

SPEAKER_10
0:20:35 (0:01:08)

thank you through the chair that is something that the bylaw staff will be keeping a close eye on to see what those impacts are um I think at this point with so many unknowns it's challenging to bring forward amendments to any of our bylaws around that because we don't yet know what the impacts are and because any changes would have impacts not just on workers who were breaking our bylaws from Fortis and wlng but on the wider population as well so we would have to consider that very carefully we do understand from conversations with other communities that have had projects like this that they have seen quite an impact on their campgrounds from workers coming from other places and using campgrounds as basically their temporary residences and in particular campgrounds that are located within neighborhoods have had some negative effects from that population

SPEAKER_05
0:21:44 (0:00:06)

counselor Anderson

Eric Andersen
0:21:50 (0:00:25)

just wanted to first ask for a couple of clarifications on the report the listing or the table camping complaints and infractions by issue and location and one of those locations is balikliff and my question is does that Encompass the mapquam forest service road and stormis River riparian Zone generally I think this Valley Cliff refer to

SPEAKER_10
0:22:16 (0:00:16)

thank you through the chair um Valley Cliff is actually focused more on the north side of the statmos river the mamcon forest service road complaints are collected specifically for that zone

Eric Andersen
0:22:32 (0:01:04)

thank you the data is presented for and this is data being collected by provincial agencies among other partners for the map going forest service road as well as for the Squamish Valley iloho the tree farm license but there's there isn't mention of ring Creek forest service road and I wonder if you might provide some background on that the reason why I ask is because and there is reference in the report to commercial operators on these roads well the main commercial operator over the years ahead on the ring Creek forest service road will be the Squamish District of Squamish squamous Nation joint Community Forest and I just wonder whether it might be why that road may or may not be included at the present time and perhaps I'm suggesting it may be of interest to or maybe you could elaborate on the considerations around monitoring ring Creek forest service road

SPEAKER_10
0:23:36 (0:00:49)

thank you through the chair the monitoring of those Forest Service Roads is done it was previously a Ministry of Forestry um the wreck sites and Trails division that's now been moved over to the ministry of environment however they are the ones who are collecting that with traffic counters which are deployed on the mamquam forest service road and the upper Squamish Valley Road as you mentioned my understanding is it it's a combination of things but I think primarily resourcing in terms of having those traffic counters deployed they they've put them in the areas where they think are best in terms of managing traffic volumes certainly through the visitor management Roundtable we could pass on to them the desire for an additional one on the ring Creek forest service road

Eric Andersen
0:24:25 (0:01:16)

I think you're perhaps that might be a consideration for the future finally um your presentation refers to our Council advocacy over the last couple of years vis-a-vis the province in identifying other appropriate locations on Crown Land naturally surrounding Squamish in support of well my question here is well I'll just relate that in our meeting with the ministry representative council last September they went through a list of the sites under consideration and in fact discounting all of them and presenting a lot of challenges with them but the one site that they did not address at all was refuse Creek and I wonder I'm just curious to your knowledge is that under consideration in dialogues that you may be aware of and I'm asking because perhaps it may be time to advance dialogue about some of these options that one in particular straddles these Columbus Community forest and the slale walk tooth Force license so if we're going to have a dialogue about Rapides Creek we should bring them in but can we advance or should we advance to your knowledge is discussion being Advanced about refuse Creek the gravel Quarry site there

SPEAKER_10
0:25:42 (0:00:32)

thank you through the chair at this point I believe the efforts have been focused more on looking at Recreation the Shannon Basin area by the province that's been their main focus right now refuse Creek was discussed during civil council members and the mayor's meeting at the ubcm conference last year as a potential option but since then we haven't heard any update on that so that's again something that could be we could request an update through the visitor management Roundtable and bring that back

Eric Andersen
0:26:14 (0:00:01)

thank you thank you chair

SPEAKER_05
0:26:16 (0:00:03)

councilor Hamilton

SPEAKER_06
0:26:19 (0:01:17)

thanks very much chair and thanks very much for the presentation I think the use of our Campground the municipal Campground I think it's a difficult balance between serving our community Through uses like day camps I think that's very important to provide parents a facility to have their children taken care of when they're working during the summer and our the benefits we gain from having visitors in town we are a very tourist motivated community and so I'd like to see if the staff could explore the possibility of opening up the campground to visitors during just the long weekends the high camping volume weekends so that we can reduce that impact of illegal camping in our community on those really high volume visitor weekends and do it on a cost recovery basis so the visitors are paying for the camping that they're using is that a possibility

SPEAKER_03
0:27:36 (0:00:36)

thank you through the chair it would be a challenge we would either have to deliver a service through a contractor or through staff and securing for only those days would definitely be a challenge and resource intensive to train and abort force and have that services for a short amount of time so essentially it would be all expense with very little Revenue to make that happen so I anything is possible but I would say that's a would be a challenge

SPEAKER_11
0:28:13 (0:00:22)

it's good thank you through the chair as well it would require a budget amendment depending on the scale I'm assuming it's not something we could absorb and it would require a budget amendment to do the even though if it was based on cost recovery it still requires it go through the budget process yeah

SPEAKER_05
0:28:35 (0:00:17)

I have a couple questions in terms of reducing the operational cost for the municipal Campground has the district considered composting toilets would that be appropriate for this usage

SPEAKER_03
0:28:53 (0:00:32)

as going back a career or two but yeah composting toilets depends on the amount of usage but they are very expansive certainly the most cost effective would be containment like what do we call it the big party parties well not just a porta potty but for long term it would be a bigger Basin that would hold the nasty stuff yeah

SPEAKER_05
0:29:25 (0:00:02)

and also in terms of oh

SPEAKER_10
0:29:28 (0:00:26)

sorry did you have something I was just going to add my understanding as well from our Public Works staff is the other main concern is the gray water and dumpy of gray water because if you have campers that are there camping composting toilets would sort of address part of the issue in terms of the sewage management but in terms of gray water you still run the risk environmental risk of not having somewhere to appropriately dispose of that

SPEAKER_05
0:29:54 (0:00:10)

and also in terms of cost reduction I was wondering if any self-registration system had been considered

SPEAKER_03
0:30:04 (0:00:28)

it has been considered it would definitely affect the revenue even with proper enforcement there is approximately 20 of people that don't pay and when we wrapped up enforcement we went from about 50 to 80 so if it's completely voluntary I would suggest that our Revenue projections would need to be drastically adjusted

SPEAKER_05
0:30:32 (0:00:14)

and in terms of we've spoken a bit about the upcoming campground that's going be to part of the Brennan Park project I was wondering if there's what the estimate of when that would be operational would be

SPEAKER_03
0:30:47 (0:00:55)

talking with our director of operations I believe that bring forward some budget costs for the 2024 budget cycle so I can get into a Five-Year Plan it does require removing the storage containers from the existing site and then building a if it's for events only in a clear field that has proper drainage and in the roadway in so there are some substantial costs if it's even just for an event only site if it's for Municipal Campground site then we are more obligated to provide more services which is where the cost escalate and that's the registration costs enforcement costs and maintenance to keep it safe

SPEAKER_05
0:31:43 (0:00:02)

thank you counselor pengill

Chris Pettingill
0:31:45 (0:00:30)

I'm just wondering and maybe this is for the future Campground but do we have any legal requirement if we have a municipal campground to allow any sort of vehicle and where I'm going with this could be restricted to only cars with or Vehicles without water systems and intents so then presumably you're avoiding you know you have to put toilets but you're avoiding gray water and so on because there's no sort of water system for people to dump is that sort of restriction or middle ground we can look towards

SPEAKER_03
0:32:16 (0:00:31)

through the chair it would be worth investigating but it then creates obstacles for some folks to visit the campground obviously but I would suggest that what we would bring forward would be escalating cost model and what would be a bare minimum to abruptly manage Municipal Campground

SPEAKER_05
0:32:47 (0:00:02)

councilor Hamilton

SPEAKER_06
0:32:50 (0:00:15)

thanks very much the for me the day camp the daycare use I think is very important is there a an estimate for how many children will be accommodated in these in that use

SPEAKER_03
0:33:05 (0:00:38)

yes good question through the chair so we have a contract and instructor healthy hearts that was previously on the Easter Seals camp and we have them currently using the site in the use or have approximately 100 Kids going through the program or building towards that in the summer Recreation and culture would be adding approximately 60 kids per week through summer programs in addition it's more of a minor but our bike camps and other folks use the set as well

SPEAKER_05
0:33:43 (0:00:01)

elsewhere French

John French
0:33:44 (0:00:31)

thanks Jaren just following up on that last question and answer from Mr Hoskins so this period between July and September and the recreational and child care programming that is contemplated am I hearing correctly this would be a mix of both District of Squamish Brandon Park programming and private contractor use for Child Care slash programming

SPEAKER_03
0:34:16 (0:00:16)

corrected it is but to clarify it is all Recreation and culture programming we have different delivery models some through staff some through contract instructors but for the public they would view it as a recreational culture program

SPEAKER_05
0:34:32 (0:00:02)

mayor Herford

Armand Hurford
0:34:35 (0:00:14)

thank you during that summer window July to September are there no community events that need this that would benefit from this camping Support over the over the weekend

SPEAKER_03
0:34:49 (0:00:45)

certainly historically we've had quite a few sport festivals and we see but perhaps on a weekly basis is applications to use Brennan Park and different aspects the challenge is balancing that event use with delivering child care or child support programs it is Amplified as well with the Burnham Park Renovations so we don't believe that Renovations will have a direct effect this year but it will become more compounding as time goes on until we can move the campground and have enough area for programs in childcare

Armand Hurford
0:35:35 (0:01:08)

thank you I understand sort of the mid the midweek use for the for the child care but this sort of swelling and capacity to support the events I think is challenging to do to do without so I'm curious to see how I guess to see how that goes this time around but that July and August load there's all of our data shows that the campgrounds are get full on the weekends through that time making it hard to run these events so I'm these two pieces just seem seen that we have that asset it seems that we're under feels like we're under leveraging it for that for that time but yeah maybe so maybe that's just a cook maybe that's just that's just a comment or what staff's perspective on the events at that time and what are we hearing from our event organizers around in and around Brennan Park that generally have used this or historically have used that facility to support their events in the past have we engaged with them and what and what sort of alternate plans are being are being made that you're aware

SPEAKER_03
0:36:43 (0:00:42)

of certainly through the fields and lands Master plan process the community was engaged on the long-term impacts there may be opportunity but it would have the trade-offs are potentially impacting job programming is to accommodate just the local events or smaller scale events that wouldn't proceed beyond the weekend I would be happy to take that back to the team and consider that and I could update the council if that could be a consideration

SPEAKER_05
0:37:26 (0:00:02)

counselor Hamilton

SPEAKER_06
0:37:28 (0:00:22)

yeah I just wanted to follow up I think it would be a very good use of the space for special events through July and August it seems to me like the day camps would be primarily Monday to Friday special events are going to be primarily weekends I think it would be valuable if we could try to open it up for special event camping

SPEAKER_05
0:37:51 (0:00:13)

I have a couple more questions the human waste issue seems to come up a lot around camping and around our parks and I was wondering if the district currently has any plans to be installing more public toilets in public places

SPEAKER_10
0:38:04 (0:01:13)

thank you through the chair so the district does seasonally deploy porta potties throughout the community and did increase them in 2022 um so there's the obviously the trail hubs which you're probably familiar with which are at a number of the schools and different neighborhoods that come up seasonally as well as other kind of hot spots to support recreation in those areas in addition we have other porta potties that get deployed out to sort of hot spots of high use every season my understanding is that the junction Park washrooms are being rebuilt and redesigned that's part of council's sorry the financial plan at the moment and beyond that one of the initiatives that our Communications team has put together is mapping of where all the public washroom locations are and when they're open throughout the community so this is a resource that's accessible to community members so they can figure out where there are toilets available to them depending where they are in Squamish

SPEAKER_05
0:39:18 (0:00:48)

thanks yeah well as a mother of small children I can have a few comments about not having porta potties in the winter and also I have friends with dogs who have some interesting experiences at our Parks as well so I just thought I'd you know put that on the radar and I was also wondering with the use of the campground for child programming over the summer I was wondering if there's any thought to pushing that into fall and or winter I understand it's not like a great suitable place for camping in the winter time but right now there are kind of outdoor education programs happening and like rape heaters or Alice Lake and I was wondering if the district had given any consideration to that

SPEAKER_03
0:40:06 (0:00:59)

thank you to make sure I understand the question so to bring programming in throughout the fall in the park we're certainly open to programming and expanding our programming our greatest challenge right now is staff and contractor resources so we have been and will continue to be advertising and pushing for new programs program ideas we'll work with our staff and our contract instructors to have as long as broad programming as needed certainly the need drops in the fall most of our programming is directed during non-school days and providing child care for folks when kids are out of school

SPEAKER_05
0:41:06 (0:00:29)

okay thank you Council are there any more questions any comments no okay should we move to staff recommendation okay seconded by Hamilton should we moved it for Council to receive

SPEAKER_15
0:41:35 (0:00:03)

both

SPEAKER_05
0:41:39 (0:00:36)

should we do them separately okay so move to that Council receive visitor management campaign plan for updates and information yeah okay and seconded by Hamilton all right and all in favor hey and Council French you'd like to move that Council open them are you going to speak to

John French
0:42:15 (0:00:28)

it um I I have drafted something that I I'd like for councils to consider so the motion would be that Council opened the municipal Campground for events only from May until July 2023 and have that be its own distinct motion and then I have another motion to follow regarding the second half of the staff recommendation

SPEAKER_05
0:42:44 (0:00:04)

second in by Amira Herford all in favor I'm sorry

John French
0:42:48 (0:00:36)

okay go for it so my thinking here is I I've heard around the table that we all support the idea of using the municipal Campground for events between May and July and then my thought with the next motion would be direct staff to come back to us with some recommendations of how we could accommodate weekend camping through July until September so this motion is simply regarding events between May and July and then I'll speak further to my thoughts on another

SPEAKER_05
0:43:25 (0:00:02)

motion

Chris Pettingill
0:43:27 (0:00:04)

sorry can the Mover just reread his motion please

John French
0:43:32 (0:00:12)

well this motion is very simple it's exactly what the staff have presented to us that Council opened the municipal Campground for events only from May until July 2023.

SPEAKER_05
0:43:44 (0:00:01)

councilman

Eric Andersen
0:43:46 (0:00:19)

that's just offering a footnote really with respect to events only from May until July 2023 the Squamish days long weekend the BC Day long weekend this year happens to fall in August I believe it's August 56 so in case that's of any noteworthiness

SPEAKER_05
0:44:05 (0:00:12)

okay do we have a secondary for counselor French's motion yeah oh yeah Erwin okay counselor mayor Herbert okay all in favor for that yeah okay and go again

John French
0:44:17 (0:00:21)

okay so the next motion that I have is that Council directs staff to explore weekend event camping and recreational and child care programming from July until September 2023 and report back to council

SPEAKER_05
0:44:39 (0:00:02)

mayor Herbert

Armand Hurford
0:44:42 (0:00:12)

yeah thank you I I'd like to be a little bit more prescriptive with it if I maybe I'll second it for a discussion and offer an amendment yeah

John French
0:44:55 (0:00:05)

maybe that's what you have forward unless you have wording that

Armand Hurford
0:45:00 (0:00:38)

yeah I'll try if you if you don't mind okay so that municipal so Council opened the Campground for rec for recreational Child Care programming from July until September 2023 and develop policy that supports event use during that time but prioritizing the child care programming just so to help with the well sorry and I will speak to it if seconded

John French
0:45:38 (0:00:04)

I'm prepared to second that but I see that the CAO is trying to inject

SPEAKER_11
0:45:43 (0:00:23)

I'm I apologize if I'm out of order here in the middle of a motion but I believe that what will help counsel with this is if I have a 10 minute time out to talk to staff about the events in the camping and the peak weekends and be able to wrap my head around that so that we can better inform you and then you can consider a motion after that without being appropriate

SPEAKER_05
0:46:06 (0:00:38)

I think so can we just I believe counselor pettingell had something to say as well and okay would you like does everybody else that we feel like that sound good okay yeah let's take a little 10 minute recess thanks welcome back and can we continue our discussion so what's that yes

SPEAKER_11
0:46:45 (0:00:53)

okay Miss glenday thank you to the chair I appreciate the time out so that we could achieve Clarity at the staff level which I think will help clarity with Council so in terms of the motion that's in front of you it talks about events until July but then Child Care programming until September in speaking with staff both events if they're weekends only so events if their weekends only can go from May until end of September so the life of the or not the life the season of the campground for the summer as well as child care programming so you could amend the motion to include both as long as Spencer referred to as Weekends Only and that way the child care programming it's Monday to Friday camping for events or on the weekends throughout the seasonality of the campground for 2023. okay thank

SPEAKER_05
0:47:39 (0:00:01)

you mayor Herford

Armand Hurford
0:47:40 (0:00:46)

thank you and the motion that I was contemplating was and similar to counselor French as well involved coming back to council or developing a policy but what I've heard here it is that can be that can be accommodated and that portion of the work doesn't need to happen so we can just have a new motion that encompasses the weekend only aspect and I would and with that definition of weekend only would the child care programming run till three or five o'clock at some point in the afternoon and then that Friday night could be in could be in play without too much of without too much of a of a hassle for those special events

SPEAKER_03
0:48:27 (0:00:37)

through the chair short answer is yes so the key part is that without impacting the child programming is child programming up to Friday afternoon evening and then it would be opened up for licensing that means a license with the District of Squamish so they would be responsible for providing the Services and then they would need to be out of the site by late Sunday afternoon and then programming could take place again on the Monday

Armand Hurford
0:49:05 (0:00:37)

thank you okay so with that in mind I'll Hazard emotional which is slightly different than the first one so that Council open Municipal Campground for recreational Child Care programming and weekend only event use from July until September 2023. oh yeah so okay one more time that Council opened the municipal Campground for recreational and child care programming and we can only camping use to support events from July until September 2023.

SPEAKER_05
0:49:42 (0:00:02)

okay second and by counselor French

Armand Hurford
0:49:44 (0:00:45)

thank you I think this is our Municipal Campground is an important asset to support our community events and our data does support that we are at or over capacity in all of our camping facilities in our community um during the during weekends so I think that this is an important step to ensure that we have that we can support our community events and the child the child care use there I think is incredibly important for our community as well so I hope that this strikes a good a good balance between both of those Community objectives I'm happy to support and thank you for your support

SPEAKER_05
0:50:30 (0:00:01)

Hills are French

John French
0:50:31 (0:01:43)

thanks chair and in speaking in favor of this motion I I'm reflecting on what is currently happening in the city of Vancouver right now on Hastings Street where we're seeing a very unfortunate scenario that is challenging for everybody and part of what we're doing here today is potentially avoiding a situation in Squamish like the one that we're currently seeing on Hastings Street and then having said that I'm particularly mindful of the Squamish dayslogger Sports weekend and ensuring that event has ample parking opportunity or camping opportunities because many of the people who come to participate in that weekend come here specifically with camping as their accommodation plan and I think that it's also worth pointing out at this point that one of the reasons we're taking this direction is we've learned that the municipal Campground is best suited as special events camping only and in regard to that there are water access limits and a particular note the winter shut off that traditionally happens at the municipal Campground limited Staffing and water pooling in the off season I think that this motion basically takes care of all of those concerns and I feel that this is the best direction for that facility this summer

SPEAKER_05
0:52:15 (0:00:01)

Elsa pettingell

Chris Pettingill
0:52:16 (0:01:38)

yeah I'll support this and my comments are sort of to the topic a little bit I maybe should have made some of them at the first resolution it just wasn't quick enough but I do think we need to be ready to scale our enforcement efforts this year and so I just hope that staff can start putting our minds to what that might mean I understand we don't want to proceed too far without sort of knowing exactly what we're reacting to but it seems like we may have a situation we need to react to quite quickly and significantly other would otherwise we may see impacts from Fortis and wood fiber quite detrimental impacts to a large portion of our community and economy so I think we need to be ready for that I am supportive of long weekend event camping throughout the summer as I've watched these discussions it is really hard to separate the sorts of camping and the needs and why people are camping I think we know we have a model that works for this event sort of camping and we're prepared to do that and there's a need there so I think we should do that I don't want to Discount though there is a whole other just housing discussion and I think that requires more work and we're going to have some conversation about it this afternoon I don't think we're in a position to tackle that at this location this year but that is a topic that I think needs more consideration so by supporting this it's not a discounting of that I just think where we are right now again this is the path for this location this year and we need to put more effort in the in the other topic thank you

SPEAKER_05
0:53:55 (0:02:19)

thank you any further comments common I'm happy to support this motion about two things that I care deeply about child care access and access to Camping so I just want to thank staff for all their hard work and putting these reports and ideas together and with that I will pose the question all in favor to that triumphant music thank you okay motion passed okay moving on to our next order of business I believe thank you yeah right we're gonna talk about the chikai fan development and debris flow mitigation update in a minute anyway good to go all right we're gonna talk about the chikai fan development and debris flow mitigation update thanks

- Staff Reports: Cheekeye Fan Development and Debris Flow Mitigation Update
0:54:44 (1:09:11)

[4890] The proposed chikai fan debris barrier has reached a major milestone with the design being completed to the expected standard. [4891] The Roots project includes a debris flow barrier to mitigate risk, as well as the development of 1215 housing units, commercial and daycare space, and park and trail upgrades. Environmental and archaeological studies have been completed, and experts have reviewed the risk tolerance criteria of the district. [4896] The project completion is expected in 2023 with adoption subject to 13 conditions which include developing permits and funding models for operations and maintenance. [4907] The strictest risk tolerance thresholds in the world have been adopted. [4913] Efforts have been made to minimize carbon and environmental impacts during construction. [4920][4921] Funding for the project will be split between General Taxation and a local service area, and stakeholders will pay at cost for future access to hazard modeling. [4930] The key design objective of the proposal is to incorporate flexibility in its operation. [4936] Traffic management and trail off-peak travel plans have been developed during construction. [4942] Efforts are being made to mitigate environmental impacts through offsetting projects and a rigorous construction environment management plan. [4944] The design feature of the barrier allows for debris flow mitigation in the event of a large event. [4947] The barrier has been designed to allow regular events while blocking larger ones.

SPEAKER_15
0:56:14 (0:02:17)

good morning chair and Council my name is David Olson I'm the manager of Municipal infrastructure with the District of Squamish and I've been leading the debris flow Hazard and mitigation review for the district and I am joined by Alex Strath who is a geological engineer and engineer of record for the proposed chikai fan debris barrier that we'll be discussing today and also Jenny green who is an engineer and project manager working for Squamish City Sky developments or sssd which is a partnership between Matthews West and Squamish Nation and I'm also joined by a number of District staff including Jonas valeniskis director of planning Heather box rooted Chief Financial Officer Sarah Bailey director of engineering Dave Merrill director of major projects and ran Souza director of financial operations we're all available for any questions and there's also a number of other members from sssd John Matthews here at the table president of sssd so Jenny and Alex have a brief presentation to provide a council with an update on Project activities for the proposed cheek eye fan development with an emphasis on the chikai river debris flow risk mitigation the project has recently reached a major milestone in advancing the detailed design to a stage where it has been reviewed by an independent expert panel that has been engaged by the District of squamous province of BC and Squamish nation and in their letter of opinion the review panel concluded that the design has been completed to the expected standard of practice for this stage of the project so this is a major milestone for this project which has been ongoing for the past 10 years and sssd are continuing to advance work on the project in order to address conditions that have been established by the district that must be met prior to adoption of the rezoning and OC CP Amendment bylaws so with that I'm going to hand it over to Jenny and Alex who will be leading you through a presentation

SPEAKER_09
0:58:32 (0:01:17)

great thanks very much David as David mentioned my name is Jenny green with sssd nice to meet you all so um yeah thanks for that intro David the intention of today really is to give counsel an update on this project as David mentioned it is ongoing for the last 10 years I believe the last time this project was at Council was in 2021 for an update on the Hazard mitigation piece and prior to that was for third reading which happened in 2018. so you know we're coming up on five years that's not to say there hasn't been work done in those five years we've been very busy and we're going to give Council an update in advance of coming back to request adoption of those bylaws later in 2023. so my plan is to speak I'll speak for um about 30 minutes I think maybe 20 to 30 minutes Alex and I will we'll present about 12 slides and then my hope is that we can really use the rest of the time as a you know a committee meeting to answer questions that some of the new counselors may have and existing counselors as well because like I said it's been a long time since we've been at this table and get feedback from you and thoughts on where we're at so I will this guy

SPEAKER_12
0:59:50 (0:00:02)

SPEAKER_15
0:59:52 (0:00:02)

oops

SPEAKER_09
0:59:55 (0:04:32)

so you should just build it just hit the arrow yeah okay great so we'll talk a little bit about the project Roots just briefly I think most people are aware of the chikai fan project it has been around for a while I'll touch on some of those conditions for rezoning adoption so there's conditions that relate to the actual Land Development itself and then some that relate to specifically to the hazard mitigation work I'll hand it over to Alex to talk about the barrier design from an engineering perspective and as well as the independent engineering review panel process that David alluded to I'll talk about the Environmental Studies that have been completed in the last three to four years to support our environmental permitting also archaeology archaeological studies that we've done a quick update on the permitting status on our schedule and then like I said we'll open the floor up for questions on either related to The Land Development itself or the hazard mitigation okay so the chikai fan as most of you know it is the one of the most studied alluvial fans in Canada North America if not the world and there is a current risk of debris flow a current unacceptable risk of a debris flow on the qigai fan that would impact the community's the community of brackendale mostly as well as the First Nations Reserves at the chikai checkmist confluence so a debris flow is essentially a very fast moving Landslide Alex describes it as wet concrete that travels faster than a person can run so it's not just fast-moving water it is fast-moving material that travels at quite a high velocity and can create significant impact so this studies on this Hazard of date back you think there were development plans here in 1980 that they said no not until we figure out this problem fix this problem so we the a number of expert panels concluded that you know before any future development can happen on the fan this risk needs to be mitigated and the district concluded in their assessment back in 2016 I believe that the best way to do that is to fund the construction of a debris flow barrier through new development what's this I'm just trying what's the next we missed one no we didn't okay sorry getting used to computers so briefly this is a an image that most of you will have seen before this is the chikai River Development land development project as proposed at third reading so this was presented to Council in back in 2018 so the chikai fan development project includes 1215 housing units including 170 affordable and Market rental housing units commercial and daycare space throughout playground park and Trail upgrades major extensions and upgrades to the Ray Peters Trail and Ross Road Central Transit node car share charging stations cash contributions and of course the construction of the debris flow barrier originally submitted in 2013 sssd has worked super closely with staff and Council to allow this development to evolve we it started in 2013 as a an application for 750 single-family homes as everybody here knows the climate has changed and we definitely need to change with it so the most recent application the one that said third reading has a mix of housing units rental units and a number of other things so if the focus of today is mostly to talk about the hazard mitigation but we are certainly open to discussing the aspects of the Land Development itself

SPEAKER_12
1:04:27 (0:00:04)

what's up

SPEAKER_09
1:04:32 (0:06:13)

so 2013 um you know the rezoning applications were submitted from 2013 to 2016 there were two expert panel reports that Quantified both the hazard of the debris flow on the chikai fan and work to develop risk tolerance criteria for essentially what development could proceed in 2014 we started to look at is it technically feasible to even build a barrier that can reduce that risk um did some preliminary site investigations and environmental work in 2015 BGC completed started their Hazard and risk assessments and then following the third re following the third reading of the rezoning bylaws in 2018 the sssd was confident to move forward with detailed design of the barrier so that started with detailed site investigations in 2019 and then 2020 through 2023 detailed engineering work supporting studies which leads us to kind of where we're at today which is in um mostly a permitting process so in order to build the barrier there's three levels of government local Federal provincial and federal obviously so we're currently in that phase of the project and the goal of the project is to complete that work in 2023 request adoption of the bylaws at the end of this year and then begin construction on the barrier shortly thereafter I don't think I have missed anything on that one so the conditions for adoption this report third reading was given to the report to the project on July 24th of 2018. prior to that there were two public hearings around both the Land Development and the hazard mitigation the adoption is subject to 13 conditions five related to The Land Development piece itself and third and eight sorry related to the debris flow Hazard mitigation piece and sssd has been working through these conditions over the last five years and we expect to be in a position to request adoption in summer of this year not sure exactly when some of those will depend on like I said other layers of permitting but hopefully at some point in the near future we'll come back and say we've checked all the boxes here's an update on that so quickly to talk about on the land development side we talked a little I talked a little bit about it on in the previous slide essentially we will enter into a Land Development agreement and commit to a number of things with respect to providing affordable housing providing commercial and daycare spaces Water and Sewer improvements updates to our traffic study following environmental recommendations would be a noise Covenant there's a number of things in there essentially right now we have a draft Land Development agreement that's being reviewed by staff and we're working closely with staff to get that into a position that it's ready to be presented to you on the hazard mitigation side again we we've spent quite a lot of time over the last three years working on the detailed design of the barrier and all the environmental permits that go along with those so the things that are outstanding from a hazard mitigation perspective again the required 10-year permits and approvals from all three layers of government those are all in queue so they've all been submitted and now we are essentially waiting for feedback from government officials on those we've completed our environmental impact assessments we've completed an operations and maintenance manual and operations and maintenance cost estimate as well as a post event restoration plan Capital cost estimate and funding models we've also developed an operations and maintenance funding model so as Council would be aware the district will own and operate this barrier in perpetuity and along with that comes a significant cost so we've developed an operations and maintenance funding model which allows staff to see the kind of the financial requirements on an annual basis and set tax rates for that the last time the project was before Council there was quite a lot of discussion on whether that would be funded through General Revenue or through a local area service charge the model that we've developed allows staff to select the percentage and decide what levels of Taxation is required build up reserves essentially it's an interactive model that will be very valuable in the near in the future of operating the barrier we expect to present the O M model to council sometime in the next couple of months it's I'd say 95 of the way there we're waiting on a number of one key piece to fill into that which is around like long-term insurance and once that happens we expect we'll be able to present that model to council for input and feedback the model has been we've worked with engineering and finance stuff on that so we're hopeful that will come together in the in the coming months and then that will be kind of the last piece of the pie from a conditions on the hazard mitigation side I think that will without I'm going to hand it over to Alex from BGC engineering right now to discuss a little bit about the design of the barrier and the review board process and then when Alex is finished I will finish up with a little bit on our environmental and permitting work thanks

SPEAKER_02
1:10:45 (0:06:09)

Jenny as Jenny said my name is Alex Strath and I'm representing quite a large design team I'm just one of the members of that team I've been working on this Design This is my 10th year working on the cheek eye to Reflow barrier design so it's been quite the process and I'll just quickly walk you through that process so when we started in 2014 the question was really just is it possible to build a barrier that meets the risk tolerance thresholds and the guidelines and we learned pretty quickly that yes it is and since that time we've really just been iterating and improving the design and looking at options and making sure that the design that we have today is really the best that it can be to meet all of the different project objectives and the way that we went about this was to seek expertise from around the world so in 2014 we traveled to Europe and met with Austrian experts and we had an Austrian expert come here and that's I'm not sure if the image of the barrier is still on the screen but that that's really where we first heard about the importance of having this vertical opening through the barrier we compared this to other options that we saw in Japan so for example in Japan the common approach would be to build a series of small check dams up the channel but we heard about the environmental impacts of that and the fact that you know prevents fish passage and requires lots of damage to the creek and we learned that well this is where the designs in Japan as well as in Europe are moving is to have a single or less number of barriers so you reduce your impact there and have a vertical opening that always allows the river to pass we also learned about the way that barriers have failed in other countries and we learned that the primary mechanism for failure is through erosion so if you have a barrier that's over topped you get erosion on the sides and then the flow goes around the outside of the barrier and the berry just stays there in the middle and we learned about sometimes the flow goes over the top of the barrier and erodes the toe and then that causes the barrier to fail and so these little details that you see on the image there are really to protect from these different failure mechanisms so we have the edges of the barrier be high so that the flow has to spill into the middle of the channel we have that outlet in the spillway so that it's spilling onto Rock so that it protects the toe of the barrier and we've used a material called roller compacted concrete that is commonly used on thousands of structures across Japan that resists erosion and allows it to be built and so that it's a single basically concrete monolith that if it's over topped it's not going to be eroded away so that process happened iteratively we started with one design we showed it to the review panel which I'll talk a bit more about in the next moment we showed it to experts from around the world and received their feedback and improve the design at each step and that's what I've been doing for like the last half of my career I guess and then we've applied a lot of what we've learned for this project to other projects around the province so it's really been a great opportunity to build expertise and debris flow mitigation design next slide yeah so I mentioned the iterative nature of the design from 2014 until about 2018 we were kind of working on the general concepts and trying to build a model of what the general barrier would look like which is this concrete structure with an opening through it but since 2018 we've been working on the details so how wide should that opening be how much material can we allow Downstream where exactly should the opening be located on the structure and all of that work has happened with the I guess oversight of this independent engineering review panel as well as the province and in the district and David's been involved in that whole process and that the way we've built the design is we started with the risk tolerance threshold that was defined by the district and we've come up with a design that meets that wrist tolerance threshold essentially and the process was at the top of the list there of documents we started with a baseline risk assessment in which we estimated what is the risk to the current population and what would the risk be to the proposed development without the barrier and then that helped us to see how much we needed to reduce the risk with the barrier and so the following work was related to ensuring that the barrier we propose does reduce the risk as far as is reasonably practicable so we looked at many other options and we found that there's really nothing else that you could reasonably build to further reduce the risk and then most recently we've been working on the detailed design drawings and specifications that will be used for construction of the structure and the review of that work was completed in December just this past December and now we're working with the contractor as they prepare the cost and pricing for construction so that's where we're at and I hope I just wanted to impress upon the group how this is something that's been going on for a long time and has been reviewed at each step of the way that's all I have to

SPEAKER_09
1:16:55 (0:08:31)

say okay thanks Alex so I expect hopefully we'll I think a lot of the questions around there will be some questions for Alex on the actual detail design so without having him go into all those details right now we'll save that for questions with respect to the Environmental Studies so one thing that is really unique about this project and the way that BGC did their design work was we had in our environmental Consultants involved early on typically with engineering projects maybe not typically but oftentimes the design is completed and then submitted for environmental permitting and not a lot of thought goes into it at the kind of structural or civil engineering design stage this barrier really focused on how can we minimize the downstream impacts because while the chigai river is not a particularly high value resource with respect to fish and fish habitat it's an active debris flow channel it's not a place fish like to hang out it does connect to both the checkmus and Squamish Rivers which as everyone knows are very high value and high quality fish habitat so we did we took a high level we did an environmental assessment trigger analysis back in 2018 essentially is this project large enough to trigger a federal or a provincial environmental assessment and it was concluded that it was not none of the triggers under both the federal or provincial EA act were met so then we proceeded with essentially Baseline environmental reporting both Fish and Wildlife we also have completed what's called a construction environment management plan so essentially that's all of the factors that the contractor will take into consideration while they're doing construction how we mitigate risk to Downstream habitats nesting all of the things that will have to be taken into account so that plan has been completed it's in draft it will be updated before Construction with respect to the Baseline report so we retained ecofish research to do this reporting for us they've been collecting fish and fish habitat data on the chikai river now for four years and their Baseline report concluded essentially that there would be no effects to fish and fish habitat would be low or negligible in their existence and they in fact concluded on the contrary that the project is expected to protect Fish Wildlife and human populations Downstream by preventing these large-scale events so what we know is that the chikai river has debris flows on a regular basis not all of them are large enough to be noticed by people living on the fan but at some point there will be an event that is larger than we have anticipated and without a barrier in place that will cause negative environmental impacts Downstream um so with respect to environmental permitting we have submitted our project to the Department of issues and oceans we're going through an authorization process with them currently and we've also submitted through the water sustainability act this is the provincial environmental permitting process for a change working in the Stream essentially change in use approvals and then additionally the barrier is located just outside the District boundary actually we can talk about that a little bit later but we've also submitted a riparian development permit to the slrd who will approve that at the local level the other kind of major piece of work that's not um engineering related is the archaeological studies that we've done so in 2014 we completed what's called an archaeological overview assessment this is the really kind of high level look at the project Dairy and footprint that study determined that there was no areas of high concern but to complete a more detailed analysis once you once you've completed the design work so that was updated in 2019 and then um in the past year in 2022 we completed an archaeological impact assessment which is a much more detailed look at the project footprint um especially the area right around the chikai river that AIA concluded that the area was found to have low archaeological potential so that essentially means that the project can proceed and during construction will operate under what's called a chance find management plan which is a kind of a common thing in construction projects if any archaeological artifacts or evidence of cultural sites are found during construction there will be a management plan in place to you know isolate and deal with those in the field so just a couple more slides I think two more um I've kind of touched on all of this but so for our barrier permitting status really we are hope we're at the point in the project where once our permits hopefully come through we'll be in a position to come back to request adoption the bylaws those include our crownland tenure application that's the you know through the province the right to build the structure and operate the structure long term on the land that tenure will be and we've applied on behalf of the district so that tenure is in the name of the District of Squamish this includes the three water applications to be able to use water from the cheek eye during construction and to actually have the structure in the river the Heritage conservation Branch approval is the archaeological piece the project has involved a significant amount of consultation and referrals so we've been working with our Squamish Nation Partners throughout we've also been working with the slave tooth Nation throughout as well as a number of overlapping land tenure holders in the area so there is heavily used by mountain bikers Recreation users Squamish Community Forest is in has tenure there BC hydra's got a power line in the area there's a number of interested parties who we work with throughout of course the District of Squamish rezoning conditions that we've been working to address the slrd will require two development permits one for riparian and one for Wildfire the Wildfire permit will be submitted when we have a better idea of if there's going to be any need for it they've identified it but we haven't submitted it yet because we don't know exactly where things will be on the site and then of course the detailed Design's been completed and kind of given the green light by the ierp and we're working with DFO on that authorization piece so our tentative schedule like I briefly mentioned at the beginning throughout the rest of 2023 we're hoping to secure the final permits that we need the community Forest Squamish Community force will be working in the area at some point this year we're not sure when but they will be in that area so that's a piece of our project that we'll be able to watch as they gain access to the basin we're thinking sometime this summer hopefully for adoption of those bylaws and then begin in construction in the fall of 2023 the construction is expected to take between two and a half and three years and so you know substantially complete 2025 2026. of course all this is subject to change depending on permitting but that's kind of where we're at right now so that's the end of my formal presentation and I think I was pretty close to my 30 minutes 29 21 22. so what I'd like to do now is yeah just use the rest of the time to address questions from counsel and if there's any other information that we can provide at this time you'd be happy to

SPEAKER_05
1:25:26 (0:00:07)

thanks for that presentation Council are there any questions

John French
1:25:33 (0:00:50)

thanks chair I think before this weekend I didn't