Committee of the Whole - 27 Feb 2024


1: Welcome to the Squamish Nation Traditional Territory
2: ADOPTION OF AGENDA
3: DELEGATIONS
3.i: Squamish Arts 2023 Agreements Update
3: TIME 10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.
4: STAFF REPORTS
4.i: Community Climate Action Plan Update
4: TIME 10:35 A.M. - 11:50 A.M.
4: LUNCH 11:50 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
4.ii: 2024 Squamish Housing Action Plan Overview
4: TIME 1:00 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
4: RECESS 3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.
5: MOTION TO CLOSE
6: TERMINATION
1: Welcome to the Squamish Nation Traditional Territory
0:00:00 (0:07:26)


SPEAKER_09
0:06:43 (0:00:42)

good morning everyone Holland squalen Oho I'm councelor Chris Pettingill chairing the committee of the whole for December 27th February or wow February 27th 2024 hope that's not a sign of things to come in this meeting welcome to the Squamish Nation traditional territory and please be advised that this council meeting is being live streamed recorded and will be available to the public to view on the District of Squamish website following the meeting if you have concerns please notify the corporate officer present at the meeting with that

ADOPTION OF AGENDA
0:07:26 (0:00:10)


SPEAKER_09
0:07:26 (0:00:10)

I will ask for a motion to adopt the agenda French second councel Hamilton councelor French moves Council Hamilton second all those in favor motion carries thank

Squamish Arts 2023 Agreements Update
0:07:36 (0:31:00)

Sarah Morris, the manager of arts and culture at the district, introduced the annual report on how Squamish Arts utilized district funding associated with their three agreements. She was joined by Kat Cozie, the executive director of Squamish Arts. Cozie presented on the three agreements, starting with a partnership agreement that included an infrastructure needs assessment funded by the BC Arts Council. She also discussed the addition of new infrastructure to their public address system and the acquisition of $7,000 worth of event equipment. Cozie highlighted the success of their youth programming, particularly the "Ampt in the Park" event, and the "Grateful Shred" partnership program. She also mentioned the Squamish Arts Festival, the Artwalk program, the community galleries, and the art school program. Cozie concluded her presentation with details about the public art agreement and the community arts and culture grant agreement.

Council members asked questions about the Artwalk program, the timing for the public art website, and the conservation report. Cozie clarified that the Artwalk program received funding from the SLRD and had installations at Britannia Beach, Furry Creek, and Pemberton. She also mentioned that the public art website would be launched by March 15th. Regarding the conservation report, Cozie confirmed that it covered the district-owned pieces. Council members also inquired about Cozie's departure and the transition plan. Cozie assured them that there were plans in place to ensure a smooth transition and that they had two strong candidates for her replacement. The council members expressed their appreciation for Cozie's work and the impact of Squamish Arts on the community. A motion to receive the report was moved by Councillor Stoner, seconded by Councillor French, and carried unanimously.

SPEAKER_09
0:07:36 (0:00:11)

you and we will invite Miss konzi up to talk about the Squamish Arts 2023 agreements oh and it looks

SPEAKER_08
0:07:47 (0:00:18)

like yeah

SPEAKER_09
0:08:06 (0:00:16)

and actually miss Dicker do you want to introduce us M Morris okay I was trying to I was having that argument in my head 5050 chance and I got it wrong I

SPEAKER_12
0:08:22 (0:00:40)

apologize it's all good I do it myself sometimes too good afternoon or good morning Council my name is Sarah Morris and I am the manager of arts and culture here at the district I'm joined with one of our Community Partners Kat cozie she's the executive director of Squamish Arts the district have three agreements with Squamish arts and as part of a requirement of all of those agreements is that they report annually on how they utilize District funding that is associated with those agreements and so with that I will pass over to catun to start the presentation thank

SPEAKER_17
0:09:03 (0:06:07)

you all right good morning as Sarah said we'll present three agreements today of which we'll start with a partnership agreement this includes all of the items below but need not memorize because we'll get to all of them individually starting with the infrastructure needs assessment this is something that we've completed in this past year we were able to do this through a grant funded by BC Arts Council so it looks at the future needs for infrastructure and arts for the district in the short medium and long terms and this is finalized and I'm taking it before my board to approve of our Communications plan and as soon as that is approved I look forward to sharing this with everyone so that we can move us forward for the district as the umbrella Arts organization that we consider ourselves to be we like to support the community in a bunch of different ways similar to something that I presented last year we were able to additionally add new infrastructure to our public address system the PA system that we use for amped and was originally funded by District funds back in during I think Co but then something really exciting that we were able to do this year as well was add $7,000 worth of event equipment so we have tents and tables and things that are really difficult to find from rental companies and really expensive and so we were able to do this year and we've had so many different organizations and nonprofits benefit from this where we're able to offer these for free to local nonprofits going into our youth programming although a lot of our programs have youth components we do have some that are specifically more focused on youth so amton the park this year was amazing we had eight nights with 28 separate performances 1,400 audience members and then 28 unique volunteer hours so that doesn't include if you had five people working in one day that would have been you know multiply to a five Factor so something ampt has been around since 2017 it's run by a lot of really dedicated volunteers that we're super grateful for but something different this year is that we had the biggest kind of Sound volunteer student group that we've ever had in my tenure and so it was amazing watching them get to learn and it's always been a place for emerging artists to perform but then this year we able to raise a lot of Youth and in fact this last Saturday in the longest night of or coldest night of the year one of our students was able to run the sound for the program and I think he's in middle school or high school like he's quite young but already able to use the sound system which actually was we had struggled to find people to run the sound in the past and so now we're raising the people through the program that we'll need in Squamish another Pro program we had this last year was The Grateful shred this is a partnership program that raised almost $188,000 with an additional 15,000 donated in kind we were able to highlight seven live painters and then something new this year that was also really exciting was a partnership with indigenous artist stank daddy who comes from the Lower Mainland so he has his own Market called good stin Market which we were able to work together to highlight more modern indigenous artists in Squamish then we would have had reach on our own moving on to Squamish Arts Festival this is far and large the largest program that we do of the year I'll speak to the stats in the next slide but we were able to bring together two full Festival days so one at Junction Park and one at Oceanfront Squamish that was around 8,300 participants and so it's some of the largest reach we have of the year we've moved it into a two-e program so we have two weeks of workshops that lead up to those Festival days you can see here a talking trees tour with tles tours we also have ceramics literary animation different workshops that people can participate in and then something new this year was a co-s Salish art lecture by indigenous sish Nation artist James Harry so he came and spoke on kind of the intricacies and differences between coish art and other local kind of regional indigenous Arts like forine and then specifically to the importance of co- stalish art on these specific lands so looking at the statistics of this we were able to raise over $163,000 in cash 105 of this was in grant funding but an additional nearly 60 Grand in private dollars and all of this was infused back into the local economy we also had around $15,000 of inine contributions and then if we look at the total amount of artists Artisans and Heritage performers that was 113 with eight local partners and quite a few volunteers and volunteer hours moving on to artwalk we were able to grow artwalk quite a bit this year we've started to receive Heritage funding for this program and so this was our second year of being able to do that and I think we were able to dial in the funding a bit better than the first year because it's looking at what we can do with it and we really looked at increasing the studio tours so we had a full weekend of Studio tours where people could go Saturday or Sunday and see inside the process of what it would look like inside of an artist studio this highlighted 87 artists over the course of a month where

SPEAKER_12
0:15:10 (0:00:00)

the

SPEAKER_17
0:15:10 (0:07:26)

artw walk was installed in 42 venues around the slrd and then we had 33 art activations so we had partnered with Squamish mural walk to go on the same weekend which really increased our reach you can see in the bottom right photo we had live sculptures that you could paint and then we also had Community hubs where there was music and art activities for youth a year round art programming that we offer is the community galleries so this gives us an opportunity to show local artists within their own homes or like within the home of Squamish and we run these through a dedicated team of volunteers and then the final program that I want to talk about is art school this was our first full year of programming of art school so we represented over 1,500 hours of participation through 323 participants with 59 classes offered one of the programs that I kind of wanted to highlight was we had a youth photo series and at the end of that series we were able to do an art exhibition at the 55 Activity Center where they even had a little opening and some of the students sold some of their photography moving on to the public art agreement so we're in a separate agreement now starting with a 2022 project that we awarded we have a Siobhan Joseph mural now installed at brackendale elementary so this act as a path to reconciliation and also a welcoming to the indigenous students and parents on campus and then we have two other public art pieces in progress so the scavenger bear sculpture by Joe Sol is going to be installed this spring and he upcycled a bunch of different materials to create this bear to highlight sustainability and Industry and then the Aaron Nelson Moody Rejuvenation will happen this may so you may have noticed that some of the panels on this are starting to peel we are bringing in an artist and also students from the stopus school to recreate this mural directly onto the plywood instead of on the vinyl so that we can have a mural that will last the test of time and this is with Aaron Nelson Moody's approval the final kind of program for the public art camp for public art is the public art camp so we brought 13 students together over four days with 22 class hours and we partner with The Foundry on this to offer the program the youth designed and implemented their own mural on the ground of the basketball court at The Foundry and so it was really cool watching them every day and to see how the artists kind of had them all create what they would want to see and then everyone looked at it together and then they all together created a group idea of what they would paint and then the final internal thing that we did for the public art project this year was we raised an additional $30,000 from the BC Arts Council to do a foundation building project that will help serve public art moving forward in the district so we had we were able to identify 170 works of art in the district so 29 of those are district owned and we'll go into the gis and then a big part of the district work that we did for this year was we hired a conservator which if you're not familiar with conservators they're trained art professionals that go through chemistry and a bunch of different things so that they understand the ways that materials interact with each other and how you can clean and preserve different materials so she created a conservation report for us which identified conservation priorities and so we have that and then now we have a plan for maintenance for public art moving forward so that the investment into public art is carried well into the future the thing that I'm really excited about which will launch at least by the end of March but hopefully sooner is we have a new website coming as a home for public art so it will be Squamish public art.com and it highlights all the art that exists here artists with bios and interactive map there will be specific kind of like walking maps and then we can partner with tourism to then really show everything that we've been working on for public art in the district it will also house resources for building owners and artists so if you wanted to have a mural put onto your building we can help you find a way to do that and then the final agreement is the community arts and culture Grant agreement so weed 13 different projects for nearly $50,000 you can see the list of the projects here so an impact example for this would have been the chief Robert Joseph lecture at the library which was had screenings both in Squamish and pimberton and then was live streamed online as well so there were two 250 live attendees at the Eagle Eye theater and at the screenings and then we've had or they've had over 400 online viewings since that event and then we gifted them the $3,300 but then they were able to raise an additional $4,000 nearly $5,000 so this represents only 41% of the funding coming from the arts and culture Grant and then that being able to turn into more money to support these causes so then if we look at the total impact of that program some of the programs are still waiting to be reported because they aren't due until the end of February and we aren't quite there yet so of the programs that have submitted their reporting there's 34,000 of the of 44,000 represented and then there was one project that returned their funding that will go until next year so that's how we get to that nearly $50,000 number so they were able to raise an additional 200,000 dollars in cash $67,000 of income support So this comes to a 562 per return on investment 290 participants and over 57,000 audience members and viewers for the different programs and that concludes the presentation thank

SPEAKER_09
0:22:37 (0:00:11)

you oh thank you very much Council any questions councilor

Eric Andersen
0:22:49 (0:00:14)

Anderson in discussing the artwalk program you mentioned around the slrd does this mean that you had venues or installations at Brena Beach and what other locations did you have in mind with that

SPEAKER_17
0:23:03 (0:00:19)

reference yes so this funding we receive or for this program we receive funding from the slrd and so we make a specific effort to reach out outside of the district boundaries so we did have at Britannia Beach we also had in Furry Creek and we had some in pton as well

SPEAKER_10
0:23:23 (0:00:00)

thank you

SPEAKER_17
0:23:23 (0:00:01)

thank you

John French
0:23:25 (0:00:16)

councelor French thank chair I'm wondering about timing for the public art website you said it's coming soon so is that like this week next month or C can you offer us a little more

SPEAKER_17
0:23:42 (0:00:29)

precise thank you yes we actually already have the majority of it up and if you went there now you could see kind of a beta version of what's available but the final version will be launched by March 15th as that's my last day with the Arts Council so we have a very hard deadline but yeah it's an amazing resource and I'm so excit excited to share it with you

John French
0:24:11 (0:00:38)

all okay that's fabulous I am particularly interested because in my time as chair of the public art committee this was something that was kind of being very Loosely worked on in the background adding content so I'm sure that the efforts of the folks who are adding content at that time is going to show up with the final okay so your comments about your departure now have me wondering about that are we soon going to hear of replacement or is that still an ongoing

SPEAKER_17
0:24:49 (0:00:30)

process yes so we have been conducting interviews and we have two great candidates that are in the Ser like we're receiving references back from their references right now it's really hard I think for the board to decide which way to take it because both candidates are great and would take them in slightly different directions so we're waiting on those references and we'll have someone amazing for you coming up

SPEAKER_08
0:25:19 (0:00:02)

soon councelor

Jenna Stoner
0:25:21 (0:00:18)

Stoner thank you I'll withhold my comments about how amazing you are until the end I do just have one question on your report and that's the conservation report I'm just curious if that covers all 175 public art pieces or if those are the 29 District pieces or some combo

SPEAKER_17
0:25:40 (0:00:32)

thereof those are the district own pieces we won't be actively completing any conservation on non-district own pieces because we don't own them the responsibility of the those is really up to the owners of those pieces and the report covers slightly more than the 29 pieces that are going on to the gis and I can share that with you or with

SPEAKER_09
0:26:13 (0:00:11)

Council so and I just want to dig into the departure comment I understand there's some plans in place to sort of smooth the transition over the next year I'm just wondering if you can speak to that a little

SPEAKER_17
0:26:25 (0:01:06)

bit absolutely we are a small But Mighty staff of two and Aisha who is our programs and Communications manager staying on and so a lot of the work that she's done revolves around amped and also art school and artwalk whereas a lot of my work on the programmatic side is on Squamish artsfest and these kind of side projects that we've taken on like the additional work for the public artart project on the Arts infrastructure study so those are all being wrapped up currently and will be wrapped up by the time that I leave so there will be no untied ends for the new Ed and then as far as the Arts vest we've already hired a festival director to come on to take on that role of kind of stewarding that program Aisha will continue to be able to run all of the other programs so I've been really careful to make sure that there's a really smooth runway for the next Ed to take on this

SPEAKER_08
0:27:31 (0:00:01)

position okay thank

SPEAKER_09
0:27:32 (0:00:04)

you and not seeing any more oh councelor

Lauren Greenlaw
0:27:37 (0:00:13)

greenla sorry thanks through the chair we occasionally get some inquiries about the room that you have at the 55 Center and I was just wondering if you could comment about its use and importance to your

SPEAKER_17
0:27:50 (0:00:34)

group yes so the Arts art school program that I shared about earlier with like the 1500 hours of participation that's where we run all of our programs out of and so not only is it a place where we run those programs but we also have a lot of infrastructure in there so we have probably 15 different easel and we have a bunch of different supplies for that program and so we are really using it to be able to run that art school

Lauren Greenlaw
0:28:24 (0:00:03)

program thanks I have

SPEAKER_09
0:28:28 (0:00:04)

comment think councelor sonar has a question and then I'll go to

Jenna Stoner
0:28:32 (0:00:13)

comments thank you counselor green Law's question reminded me in my other question which is where do you store the Arts event in like stuff that you've collected so like the tents and the tables where do those

SPEAKER_17
0:28:46 (0:00:29)

live those all live in the Arts Council building at Junction Park which is a critical storage space for the PA and also for all of the new infrastructure because it's heavy it's really difficult to move and even just moving the PA from one side of the park to the other side of the park is a bit of a mission so it's a really critical space for

SPEAKER_09
0:29:16 (0:00:13)

us okay I guess go around for comments I'll start with councel Greenlaw and then is sure yeah do a motion to receive

Jenna Stoner
0:29:29 (0:00:01)

make a motion to receive

SPEAKER_09
0:29:30 (0:00:10)

okay councelor Stoner moves councelor French seconds all in favor motion carries and I'll start with comments for coun

Lauren Greenlaw
0:29:40 (0:00:34)

Greenlaw sure it's not oh yeah I just want to say thank you for all that you do and all that you have done and best of luck on your next Adventures it's just always such a pleasure to see what you present here the quality of the projects that you drive in our community and the level of Engagement ment that you get it just really speaks to the it's a testament of the quality of the programming that you provide and yeah I just want to thank you for using our public funds so well you just you provide so much to the community and I really appreciate it everybody does everybody really appreciates it thank you

SPEAKER_08
0:30:15 (0:00:01)

and councelor

John French
0:30:16 (0:01:07)

French thanks chair I'll be sad to see you move on you've done great work and I'm looking forward to the person who gets to take over your work and Carry On and one of the things that I wanted to share here is my observation when I think back to this organization in the early 90s it very much was an artistic organization and finances didn't appear to be a strong suit for the passionate folks who were involved they were just good at other things and I've seen over the last little while how an emphasis has been put on finances and it hasn't detracted from the great artwork that's being produced by our community and has really strengthened the community because there's now a financial backbone that seems to be solid and I'm hoping that will carry on after your departure

SPEAKER_08
0:31:24 (0:00:03)

thanks councelor stoner

Jenna Stoner
0:31:27 (0:01:01)

thank you to the chair thank you for all of your work and the leadership that you've provided both to this organization and to the Arts community and the community as a whole I might cry it's really been invaluable I know that there's an amazing board behind art Squam Squamish Arts and you've had a lot of support as well and working with the district has been a phenomenal partnership but part of that has also been having somebody as Forward Thinking and Innovative as you in that role who's been able to bring all of these different pieces together the amount of programming that you've been able to provide to our community is phenomenal and so grateful that you have so diligently wrapped up or are wrapping up the public art assessment as well as the space needs assessment because those are things that are going to continue your legacy as leader in this position for years to come because they're going to set us up well as a community to advance our Arts and culture so thank

SPEAKER_09
0:32:29 (0:00:02)

you counc

Eric Andersen
0:32:32 (0:00:05)

Anderson I have nothing ready to add but all the best caty

Andrew Hamilton
0:32:38 (0:00:45)

councelor Hamilton yeah thanks very much I didn't get to know you very much over the last year but certainly the work you've done and the two annual reports I've seen these are amazing examples of how I hope that we can build more and more partnership ships with active and engaged and contributing members of our community I think it's an amazing example of how the district can provide some support provide that Baseline and then the experts in our community that people who are passionate can use that backbone and do more with it so thank you very much for being part of that and strengthening our community thanks

SPEAKER_08
0:33:23 (0:00:01)

mayor

Armand Hurford
0:33:25 (0:01:15)

Herford than thank you for the presentation and all of your work not just in the past year but in all of your time here I think you know art is kind of means so many things and art for the sake of art is wonderful into itself but when we're presented with something that has you know hard numbers around Roi numbers of 56 62% on certain projects it's truly remarkable and but I think there's other ways to measure the success I think you did a good job of capturing of capturing those so the impact of this work really to the fabric of our community is substantial so thank you so much for that and I have confidence that you're as much as we are absolutely going to going to miss you I'm excited for your new adventures and for the I know that you're setting up this organization well for Success into the future so thank you so much for your work I look forward to seeing what's next for SW sharts thank

SPEAKER_09
0:34:40 (0:02:01)

you yeah thank you it's a little bitter suweet I've been fairly involved with the Arts Council I think to the last four executive directors and I've seen four incredible people each one building on the last and in my sort of time and awareness with the art squash Arts now I guess seeing that growth is incredible and you mentioned only having two staff and I'm not sure that people realize the Ed job in particular isn't a regular job with the kind of results we've seing it is a it's a whole like it's a whole great big thing and normal people and I mean this in a very positive way don't get the results that we've seen from the Arts Council and Squamish Arts it's been four really incredible people and where you've taken it is just amazing I think one of the other things and I know Squamish Arts has often had discussions about it I don't know that people always realize that when they walk downtown especially in the summer and all these amazing things are happening that it's a really small and mighty team and a whole bunch of Volunteers in the community coming together you know it's the district hopefully we facilitate a bit and the Squamish Arts Builds on that and then we see artists in the community building on that the explosion of arts and I've said it before in Squamish the last couple years has been incredible and I think of the Spoken Word Series and all these other Arts events that are building on what swam sharks is doing it's just so incredible the coldest night of the year there's people they're just having fun and sort of moving and dancing a little it wasn't meant to be a dance party but yeah just all the little pieces coming together really making you know we talk about livable and vibrant and we also we often think of that I think in the environmental sense but when you see the cultural and the social piece and people wanting to gather and have Community outside it's just incredible and Squam Squamish Arts is a driving force behind that so thank you so much yes please

SPEAKER_17
0:36:41 (0:01:26)

thank you chair when I moved to Squamish eight years ago I had moved from Dallas which was the largest contiguous Arts District in the nation it's 68 acres and I got here and I didn't see the Arts that I wanted to see and so the last couple years being in this position has been something I could only dream of because now when I look at Squamish I do see a place for arts and so much of that really comes down to the support that we've received from Council and also from staff the finding a base of funding for admin is incredibly difficult for Arts organizations it's really easy to fund like the shiny you know programs with all of the results that we can show but it's really difficult to pay stuff and so the base of funding that we're able to receive through the district and the increase of funding that we receiving this year is so invaluable to bringing this to fruition and I can't thank you enough for that and you may not know but Sarah and I meet every two weeks and we're quite often on the phone to Devon and I this position is so well supported by staff and it Beyond just the financial the relationship that we have as organizations has been so beneficial to moving that forward so thank you for that as

SPEAKER_09
0:38:07 (0:00:28)

well okay well thank you it sounds like a perfect note to leave the conversation on so wish you all the best and so much luck in your new Endeavors sorry to lose you but I know you'll do great things there and hopefully you'll come back and visit us and tell us about what you're doing in Texas so thank you so much so why don't we take do we need a bit of switch over time no okay so

Community Climate Action Plan Update
0:38:36 (2:30:29)

Ian Pickets, the Manager of Sustainability and Climate Change at the District of Squamish, presented an update on the Community Climate Action Plan (CCAP). He was accompanied by his team, including Shannon White, Lord Witten, Zelner Geresh Mander, and Dor Gunn. Pickets provided background information on the CCAP, which was created following the council's declaration of a climate emergency in 2019. The plan aims for a 45% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 and net carbon neutrality by 2050. Pickets reported that 78% of the actions outlined in the CCAP have been completed, are ongoing, or have been initiated. He also highlighted the challenges of maintaining completed actions and the need for resources to do so. Pickets also discussed the future iteration of the CCAP, which will be revised in 2024.

Council members, including Jenna Stoner, Andrew Hamilton, and Lauren Greenlaw, engaged in a discussion with Pickets and his team. They asked questions about the scale of embodied emissions, the balance between measuring impact and doing the work, the capturing of industrial emissions, and the potential for incorporating demolition waste into a circular economy. Pickets and his team provided responses, explaining the complexities of measuring emissions, the efforts to improve metrics and monitoring, and the initiatives to encourage waste reuse. The council also discussed the separation of adaptation and mitigation in the CCAP. In the end, the council received the Community Climate Action Plan status update and endorsed the proposed scope of the 2024 Community Climate Action Plan revision.

SPEAKER_09
0:38:36 (0:01:14)

I will call up Mr pickets and his team to speak to us about the community climate Action Plan update yeah please

SPEAKER_02
0:39:50 (0:18:30)

proceed thank you very much good morning mayor and Council my name is Ian pickets I'm the manager of sustainability and climate change here at the District of Squamish excuse me my pronouns are he his and I can be addressed accordingly for efficiency just I will deliver the presentation today but the entire sustainability team is with us and is happy to engage in the discussion afterwards so I am joined by Shannon White Lord Witten zelner geresh Mander and also dor Gunn is with us and several other staff are available online so we're going to start with a little bit of background information and then we will move into a section that is an update on the implementation status of the CCAP update so afterwards we're going to move into the CCAP Revision in 2024 looking toward the scope and strategy for this I totally recognize that these are frankly kind of annoying things to delineate like there's a CCAP update and then an update on the CCAP it's really hard to tease out it's just a language issue so I've tried to H highlight the current implementation status update issues in blue and the future CCAP the future iteration of the CCAP in red just for language Simplicity as you're all aware Council declared a climate emergency in 2019 which resulted in many actions including the creation of the community climate action plan or the CCAP this document is ambitious and calls for a 45% reduction in ghg emissions for 2030 and net carbon neutrality for 2050 the CCAP was created with a number of assumptions underlying it one is that we are Focus solely on community emissions another is that there is ready access to low carbon electricity along with other assumptions one helpful reminder is there's four types of actions in the CCAP so there's things that we can direct that the district has control over we can incentivize some things or make them easier we can partner with others to try to bring things to fruition and we can educate both others and ourselves to move this forward I find this very helpful to remind myself and others because we have we only have so much scope and so much teeth on various actions and there's a number of players that have to come together to achieve these very ambitious goals so to update you on our progress on the CCAP actions I am pleased to report that 78% of the actions outlined in the CCAP we have either completed or they're ongoing or we have initiated this I recognize that this is a crude indicator as some actions are much more difficult than others and some lead to more emissions reductions than others but in my opinion it does indicate a strong level of overall progress and it does reflect a really strong Council priority and that this is high on the work plans of a number of Staff throughout the organization another reminder is that the 54 actions that are completed almost all of those are ongoing so when we move in action into completed it takes resources to keep it incompleted and in this update we actually had one action leave completed into the initiated category so we there's very few things that we can do say check and move along every action that goes into completed means that there's a little bit more or a lot more resources that have to go into maintaining that so that is just a challenge that I think it's helpful for us all to be aware of when we're thinking about capacity and resources there are small subset of actions seven that we have decided to not pursue the technology has changed the costs were seen to be too much or they're redundant with another action that we that we took these and the progress on the CCAP actions is outlined in the attachment and we are happy to go into more depth about any of these progress update these projects that we have talked about so as you're aware we do not currently have annual community emissions data we are in a partnership to create this that project is unfortunately been delayed a little bit but we are confident that we are going to get this up and running shortly and that this data will the creation and annual review of this data will be part of the 2024 CCAP revision and update so just for reference this is our corporate emissions data we do have very good corporate data that shows a modest ghg reduction since it peaked in 2020 my somewhat educated estimation is that our community emissions are following about the same they've plateaued and are probably going down slightly also worth noting that is a more significant per capita reduction however the gross ghg inventory is very likely staying about the same we have been fortunate to be able to leverage our internal budgets with quite a bit of external resources and time to support action so here's some recent funding updates a couple of note we are about to receive our third round of local government climate action progr program or LGC cap funding from The Province for another $153,000 in 2024 we also just received a $35,000 Grant from BC Hydro for the installation of an electric heat pump at the library there's a couple others noted in this slide that I'm going to talk about in more detail in upcoming slides but happy to report that we are just over $2.5 million in external funding helping to enable our action to date one organizational update is that sustainability has moved into the community services department do not misread this we haven't been asked to do community service we are in community services no longer in Community Development so this creates a lot of really exciting opportunities it provides a direct linkage to Capital project to Public Works to facilities and to rec Recreation also goes without saying that on the on the flip side we have to work to maintain the existing relationships we have with planning building and Engineering we feel like we're in a good position having that strong foundation and also the proximity of our offices really helps with that another noteworthy update is that there is now a new Transportation group that you're probably aware of that is housed within engineering and so the sustainability group reports to engineering now and is not with within sorry the transportation group reports to engineering now and is not within sustainability again we still maintain a very strong ongoing relationship with that group so now I'm going to just give a few highlights and updates just highlighting a couple of the actions in the attachment this is a little bit shorter than it's been in previous years because we want to give lots of time and discussion to the 2024 larger update and iterate a review of the CCAP so One update I'm excited to share with you is that we are working diligently in an attempt to establish the youth climate core program to Squamish for this summer this is a really Innovative program that pays younger people a living wage to engage in climate action in communities so it's based on the idea it's giving youth a sense of agency in this very serious daunting threat of climate change it's increasing youth Civic engagement it's paying a living wage and it's also enabling a lot of increased action in communities so to make this happen we are looking to secure funding from a variety of different sources so we are using some of our own planning to use some of our own operational CCAP budget some of the lgap funds from the province looking to secure external funding from Vancouver Coastal Health and also from foris for a pilot program that I will talk about in the next slide and then also ycc is actively securing federal jobs funding as well and if all those things come together and it's looking very positive that will enable this program to happen this summer another really exciting project that we are in the final stages of planning is we are seeking about a $100,000 of funding to support a pilot project of air sealing in Squamish and Whistler homes this is a really important and missing element in the home retrofit and home Energy Efficiency field there's very few contractors available to perform air cealing and it's one of the most effective kind of bang for your buck measures often you can you can reduce your air changes per hour in your home by two to three air changes per hour with just a few hundred and a few hours of work so we are negotiating to have the youth climate Corp members trained and deliver this air seiling ceiling work and of course under train under contractor supervision and they're going to have to be trained another really hopeful co- benefit of this is now we will arm a number of Youth with this skill and who knows hopefully maybe one of those would decide to open a contracting service where they offer this to members of the community that individual might do very well for themselves in such a role hint to anyone who's listening this is a really important piece of work that can be done these are images from the Vancouver pilot project that was that was quite successful so these are some of the kind of holes in the house that they will be sealing up another exciting project is we were approached by UBC and offered a fully funded sustainability scholar program to support our community climate Action Plan update the plan is to have this individual focus on embodied emissions and incorporating those in the update and pending Council feedback that is our intended use of this position we also with regards to construction and deconstruction and diversion we have now two refunds fully processed for demolition sites that achieved 88 and 81% waste diversion respectfully we are seeing evidence that the bylaw is working and we are going to be coming back and looking for further Improvement to this byaw later this year so possible I updates include increasing the fee to kind of incentivize people to participate looking for ways to encourage home relocation as a viable option and adding renovations to the scope of this of this work that's currently one of the missing kind of pieces that is not captured through construction or deconstruction another update we're excited to share is that we are moving quite aggressively for our Municipal electric vehicle Fleet we have five new EVS ordered for 2024 and including one electric truck and two electric vans so really neat to see that we're kind of moving into that kind of next level of vehicle for electrification we also an ongoing focus and a large kind of it's and a big point of focus for the update for 2024 is working toward improving our metrics and monitoring you will note that we have a new column in appendex a that you haven't seen before which is outcome and measurement we acknowledge that some of those are better than others but it's something we really are focused on improving and Reporting back this has been a focus for Mr Stoner who's provided a lot of really helpful support and in the firefighting business these measurements are really important so a lot of really good conversations and feedback and working toward improving this our senior energy specialist Mr Mander just compiled this table for your reference these are our building emissions and also further evidence that why we should continue putting resources into Brennan Park also interesting seeing the difference between natural gas and electricity the emissions associated with each okay so now we're going to switch gears and look forward to the to the 2024 CCAP review and update so the recommendations that we are providing we hope closely reflect the feedback we've gotten from Council over the last number of years in our CCAP updates in our strategic plan updates and the topical conversations that we've had with you regarding waste Transportation and buildings so our plan is we want to review all of the actions and assess our progress related to each of them and then put a lot of work into refining and prioritizing them right now 122 actions without a really clear prioritization is a little bit we feel is we could be a little bit more actually a lot more strategic to than that another thing that we have found a kind of a pinch point that we come up against really often is we need to consider capacity in each of these actions so that is often a limiting factor and we would like to incorporate that into the analysis what is the implication for public works or for Recreation or for bylaw of these of these actions and to help us plan for those and start to make this plan very explicitly Squamish focused we have this good Baseline of work and now we can move forward really honing in on what we have done and what we can do and also as noted before improving measurement that's something that we need to get better at a couple scope changes that we want to that we are planning on that we want to share with you one is to add embodied emissions in a more significant man manner in the CCAP update this could be enabled through the sustainability scholar program building on our embodied carbon guide that we created about a year and a half ago so that leadership provided from UBC can be a real help and we don't know what it's going to look like now maybe another big move or incorporate it into existing big moves but we're excited to look into this large source of emissions and how we can how we can best bring this in another update that another expansion of scope that we are proposing is in the 2020 CCAP we made the assumption that we have ready access to low carbon electricity in British Columbia while that is still the case there is ever increasing electricity demands and we believe that it's time to start thinking toward low carbon El energy generation in not in house but in our community low carbon energy generation has u local economic benefits and also has adaptation or resilience co- benefits as well so for these reasons we recommend expanding the scope to consider this in a more fome manner we have thought carefully a number of communities have in integrated climate plans that incorporate adaptation and mitigation actions well we acknowledge that there's benefits of putting both into one large plan we believe that at this point it is best to just focus on climate change mitigation in the CCAP update our recommendation is based on the fact that we are we are acting quite aggressively on climate change adaptation as well right now these are images from our integrated flood management strategy and our fir smart program kind of as evidence on this and incorporating adaptation into the community climate action plan would lead to a fair bit of repeated work and would also require significant impact from staff that already have very full work plans we will be sure to include adaptation as a co- considerer throughout and look toward co- benefits between the two throughout the document we are confident that we can still do that while not bringing mitigation or sorry not bringing adaptation into the plan in summary we believe that we are making continued progress toward implementing the CCAP actions fortunately this has been enabled by significant external funding and we are very aware that there is substantial work to go and also we are working toward the CCAP review that is to take place in 2024 and our plan is to kick that off in earners in April so we will end the conversation here and we of course welcome comments questions and feedback the recommendation is that the committee receive the community climate action plan status update and that the committee endorsed the proposed scope of the 2024 Community climate action plan revision thank you very

SPEAKER_08
0:58:21 (0:00:07)

much thank you Council questions

SPEAKER_09
0:58:28 (0:00:01)

coun

Jenna Stoner
0:58:30 (0:00:29)

Stoner thank you to the chair thank you for the update and to your team and yourself for all the work a few questions where to start in terms of The Proposal of wrapping in embodied emissions into the update I'm just you can speak to the scale or magnitude of these emissions relative to what's already in

SPEAKER_02
0:58:59 (0:01:21)

there that's an excellent question through the chair so embodied emissions are about equal to our community emissions in its entirety but we are one of the things we're really looking for feedback on is bringing in all embodied emissions into our inventory could really hamstring us because many of those embodied emissions we don't have much or any J jurisdiction over so if we double our inventory with things that we can't change all of a sudden we've made that those reduction goals not possible or completely reliant on other levels of government or other players so our plan is to work closely with the UBC scholar to figure out which how to best do that like so we're going to have to have an embodied a scope three emissions inventory to some level maybe we can take a subset of those emissions and incorporate them into our community emissions maybe we have a separate embodied emissions kind of category that we track separately but is not part of our Target so was a long answer to say I don't know but we're it's a it's an exciting challenge that we're thinking toward and look forward to figuring out the best way to do

Jenna Stoner
1:00:21 (0:01:04)

yeah I think that's helpful I think one of the challenges as you articulated is how much control that we actually have on making progress towards that but also recognizing that the overall goal is to reduce ghg emissions and so maybe advocacy is the best tool despite how frustrating it can be at times my other question was going to be where was it oh yeah the efforts to try and improve measurement and so this is somewhere where I think we always get a little bit stuck this is really complex work to actually measure progress on and I think the balance of effort and time and capacity that goes into measuring Impact versus just doing the work and I'm wondering if you can speak to that a little bit in terms of both like annual updates and then also as we look to the 2024 update like how much time do we actually spend trying to update the inventory and gather that data versus just we know that transportation and waste are two of the biggest things so how do we keep doing that

SPEAKER_02
1:01:25 (0:01:11)

through the chair it's a great question I think you kind of answered it yourself in that statement in that no I don't mean that in a flippant way that you're right that it it's not going to change what we need to focus on we kind of know the big the big thrusts that we need to move forward however a community inventory is not actually that hard to put together we've partnered with a external organization that is putting together the community inventory so just to not repeat efforts we are allowing them to do it and we're going to give them some resources and that project unfortunately has gotten delayed so that so to be honest the only reason we don't have a community inventory a year ago is that project got delayed and for us to go ahead and do it and them to repeat it is a little silly so I do believe we can get better monitoring in metrics without a whole bunch of extra work and I do think there is room for in is for all of our actions to have a measurement and an outcome and we can push ourselves to better track and engage Pro progress on the on

SPEAKER_09
1:02:37 (0:00:12)

that thank you okay I have councelor Greenlaw and then councelor Hamilton oh okay go to councelor

Andrew Hamilton
1:02:49 (0:01:14)

Hamilton thanks very much so on the this is really hard and really big work and one of the things I'm that wraps around in my mind a lot is the measurement side of it how do we know we're making progress how do we know when we've arrived at our targets right I think counselor Stoner hit most of my queries on that it really is just hard to make the measurements so I'm going to ask my another question that I have about Demolition and the circular economy so when we talk about our demolition bylaw we have diver waste diversion into different streams of waste but we don't talk much about using that reusing that into something else there is a ton of material that comes out of a demolition that can be put back into the economy now is are there any moves are there any attempts or what is our vision for putting demolition waste back into a circular economy particularly wood waste I mean that that's a huge piece of

SPEAKER_01
1:04:03 (0:00:47)

it thank you through the chair my name is Laura Wht zelner I'm the Outreach sustainability coordinator good morning everyone great question so one thing that I think that should be noted already in our demolition waste diversion bylaw we give twice the credit for reuse so this is already what we're doing to further incentivize reuse over recycling this is a big focus in our bog which is different to others that we see in the province in addition we do support initiatives that we have in town and we're definitely advocating and connecting reuse is more important than recycling in the scope of demolition 100% And we support as we see initiatives coming

SPEAKER_04
1:04:50 (0:00:04)

up yeah

SPEAKER_02
1:04:55 (0:00:31)

to add to that our Economic Development Group has put a lot of focus and effort into toward circular economy and there's three folky in the work that they're doing it's food textiles and the built environment most of the built environment has is coming back into our work Miss stone is on the line if you would like to speak further to that please turn on your turn on your video but if not we can go forward with the conversation thanks

SPEAKER_15
1:05:27 (0:00:50)

hi the only addition I would make to that is one of the pieces of funding that we received to support the circular economy is the circular economy Trailblazer program and one of the things that we are currently developing is the criteria for the Innovation challenges and we will develop an innovation challenge that's dedicated to buil environment and so the Upstream Solutions will be prioritized and the outcome of that circular economy Innovation Challenge is that the I don't want to say winning but the successful participant will receive $20,000 in funding to Pilot their proposed initiative that the circular

SPEAKER_01
1:06:17 (0:00:20)

solution to add to this we do have a wood Sal or we're working on a wood salvaging program at the landfill as well to further you know support the ReUse of the wood which is one of the biggest contributors to construction and avoidable construction demolition waste in our

SPEAKER_09
1:06:37 (0:00:03)

community councelor

Lauren Greenlaw
1:06:40 (0:00:34)

Greenlaw yeah thanks sorry I got distracted by your last comment just how does the community access the resources to know like how to engage with the circular economy and how like how do they is there oh my God I'm going to finish this sentence at some point and it's going to be amazing how can the Community Access this salvaged wood for instance is there a

SPEAKER_11
1:07:15 (0:01:10)

way thank you my name is Shannon White I'm the integrated Solid Waste specialist at the District of Squamish great question so the wood salvaging program is still in the works where there's a lot of pieces that would have to come into play behind the scenes but once it is launched there will be promotion through the communications department and an a registration opportunity for the community so that for that specific project that being said for the circular economy at large how residents and businesses get involved the economic development team has a un regul newsletter that they send out to everybody who subscribed and I believe it's not just businesses it could be anybody in the community and so there's a lot of information being fed through that because it does a lot of does apply they're also on a lot of different social media platforms as well as our Communications team we do have a landing page on at the District of Squamish however I would say the more Nimble flow of information is probably through social media channels the District of Squamish media channels social media

Lauren Greenlaw
1:08:25 (0:00:30)

sorry okay thanks okay and then I had some questions about CCAP in general thanks for answering that random question I just came up with but yeah so you showed our corporate emissions which I assume is means our emissions as an organ organization is the District of Squamish and you mentioned upcoming Community emission estimates but how are we capturing industrial emissions is that yeah and then yeah

SPEAKER_02
1:08:56 (0:00:26)

large industrial emissions are outside this oh sorry through the chair large industrial emissions are outside the scope of our community inventory currently there are no large industrial emitters in Squamish that is likely to changed in the very short term as that another project gets under underway or maybe that has so wood fiber LG would be a large industrial emitter so would not fall under our community inventory

Lauren Greenlaw
1:09:22 (0:00:08)

yeah well I would assume there are emissions Associated as well with the terminals but I so is anybody capturing that is that being captured on a provincial level

SPEAKER_02
1:09:31 (0:00:19)

the those smaller Industries fall within our community inventory so yeah at a at a certain level they get taken out of a community inventory and are part of their own inventory and that's to reflect that a community has less control over those so they fall into our provincial emissions inventory

Lauren Greenlaw
1:09:50 (0:00:02)

but they are still being captured somewhere

SPEAKER_02
1:09:52 (0:00:05)

they should be in our provincial emissions inventory yes thank

Lauren Greenlaw
1:09:57 (0:00:25)

you and then you also mentioned that adaptation is not part of the CCAP because it's just too big of a scope but I just wanted to be clear that we are still taking action in terms of adaptation but I think I think that speaks to your comment earlier in your presentation where you're saying like this is how many people in the district are involved in the CCAP like adaptation is a broad ranging topic

SPEAKER_02
1:10:23 (0:00:12)

that to the chair I would I would say that adaptation and mitigation are similar in scope and size so putting adaptation would essentially double the double the document and double the staff resources required

Lauren Greenlaw
1:10:35 (0:00:10)

I just want to be clear for anybody who's listening that AB these are still incrementally happening just in captured in different ways okay

SPEAKER_09
1:10:46 (0:00:05)

thanks councelor Anderson councelor Herford I'll put myself on the list and then councelor Stoner

Eric Andersen
1:10:52 (0:01:19)

thank you item 1.1 improving deconstruction practices over the last year we've had a Decon or demolition site downtown and two houses in brackendale that prompted Community discussion and not least also on the part of contractors interested to reach the developer my question regards you mentioned the report the embodied admissions report of December 2022 we were collaborator and produc in that report and I'll just quote from it to create public facing information about homes slated for demolition at the building permit application stage which would allow house relocation and material salvaging companies to contract contact homeowners or developers for potential moving or salvaging opportunities you've mentioned that the demo by law will be under review and that fees will be evaluated for increase and that home relocation is an option that you would wish to encourage are you is it an idea to introduce that public facing information initiative so that potential contractors can contact developers in a timely

SPEAKER_01
1:12:11 (0:00:19)

manner through the chair thank you for the question yeah I think this suggestion has been discussed a few times and it's certainly something that we will also review when we consider Next Step and considerations on how to expand on the BW and how to make it more

SPEAKER_09
1:12:30 (0:00:07)

effective okay councelor sorry mayor Herford and then myself and then councelor

Armand Hurford
1:12:38 (0:00:48)

Stoner thank you I'm going to pick up just briefly on the adaptation mitigation discussion and I agree with the assessment of keeping these separates and separate pieces of work although they you know being conscious of where they do overlap and where those opport unities exist I suppose this is more about how we as an organization use this plan and adaptation plans and our ranking sort of have those discussions between the two I know that funding for those actions come generally from different areas but these are two important bodies of work so how does the CCAP or how will a CCAP going forward sort of how do we resolve that tension as an organization so we move strategically or is this not an issue because the funding comes from different avenues for better for worse that's how it how it

SPEAKER_02
1:13:27 (0:01:46)

works to the chair that's an excellent question and I I'll try to keep this short but it's a fascinating basically the separation from the two came back into like the early 90s and the incorporation of the intergovernmental panel on climate change and it's like it's essentially a mistake to put these two and they're they are fundamentally interrelated that we have to adapt because there's too much emissions in the atmosphere and we have to mitigate because we can only adapt so much so they are absolutely compliments not competitors and I do believe we have done a reasonable job in the CCAP of articulating that and also in our in our website we have quite a bit of language on adaptation and mitigation and where they come together and I do I think it's to the credit of provincial and federal governments they're quite separate funding streams for them so we are we have we have yet to come to a position where one or the other we put forth funding like for example Mr rolson and I talk quite regularly and he'll say hey have you looked at this funding opportunity and I'll say well it's much more resilience oriented why don't you look into it for the integrated flooding management plan so I do believe to credit to our provincial government that they have they are quite complimentary in their funding streams Etc that were I have yet to see a position where it's one or the other or we've had to make it say we're going to throw our lot in an adaptation and let mitigation go for now so I do feel quite confident we're in a on a quite a complimentary stage and I do credit Council into seeing that big picture I don't think you've put ever put us in a situation where it's one or the other thank

Armand Hurford
1:15:13 (0:00:58)

you also in your in the first in the staff report mentions a couple times the sort of more specific actions where I think it's size and scope of revision if scope is increase more external staff time or internal and external support will be required and below that engagement with consultants if Council requests more consultant support and to me that goes right into your those two things combined with this other consideration points where talking about how like our staffing reason resources to develop plans and Implement plans so why were those two pieces particularly included here around the consultant piece like is this a departure from where from how the original plan was developed and substantively or just could you talk me through that particular piece

SPEAKER_02
1:16:12 (0:01:17)

sure through the chair so the our budget right now has the underlying assumption for example that we wouldn't broaden the scope to include adaptation so we've so that it relies on a very Sim somewhat similar scope the budget for this revision and update is also quite a bit leaner than the original plan and that reflects that there's going to be the that District staff are going to essentially hold the pen on this and then get support and expertise from the Consultants given how much work that we've done it just makes sense for us to kind of lead the charge and get the support the main things that Consultants are going to going to be really helpful with or the measurement and the monitoring piece to help us crunch the numbers and also Consultants can do a really good job of going and looking at other communities and say hey look what Nelson's doing look what sanch is doing Nimo did this and it really didn't work so we're gonna we are going to hold the pen and get support and expertise from external groups so the budget is significantly smaller it's about a third of the budget for the original CCAP with that in mind and we also were not starting from scratch please let me know if there parts of your question I didn't answer I have a feeling there are

Armand Hurford
1:17:29 (0:01:53)

no that all that all makes sense to me I just don't not often I don't recall too many times where we see that actually the engagement with Consultants being part of the STA of the staff reports more like the higher level goals that we're doing so I just wondered why we were talking about that specific piece and in this but that makes that makes sense what you're what you have there and I think the I'm excited about them body carbon work although I recognize as you as you said this is something that may be challenging to impact substantively with the mechanisms that we have I did want to highlight that some un some deeper understanding of that of where those levers or where that responsibility does rest and what the order of magnitude of the impacts could be in that area I think would be great because it will fall into that likely a big piece of this will fall into that advocacy work so it would be nice to see what that just build some context for Council and for the community around the challenges there so we could attempt to carry that forward as much as councelor Stoner said advocacy's a challenging Endeavor but I think it's I think it's important because we are looking at it's this isn't just a mathematical exercise this is we want like the overall ghgs is what we're looking to reduce so we need to be careful we're not being too selective on what we're what we're discussing and does wood waste fall into this as well this was something that was discussed in various pieces over the years and I know that we have historical wood waste sort of landfills documented not documented over time and I didn't see mention of that here or did I miss it do

SPEAKER_02
1:19:22 (0:01:11)

the that's a good point so wood waste landfills should be part of our community inventory they were left out of our community inventory in the last Community climate action plan because there was so much uncertainty I believe it's an appendix one it looks at the different sources and the airb bars put or go into the negative for the wood we they dwarf the emissions essentially it's a statement that we just have very poor information there has been increased information gained from that we partnered with an external group to run and a couple c s to run a week-long event to understand wood waste better and different beneficial uses a couple counselors attended parts of that also we've had wood Waste landfill owners undertake studies so they've gotten a much better indication of the methane emissions from them so part of this CCAP review will definitely include a concerted effort to get that number to a point of confidence that we can at least include it yeah that's a good definitely a good point thank

SPEAKER_09
1:20:33 (0:00:10)

you I'm gonna let councelor French jump in he hasn't gone yet and I'll go to myself and then start working through the second speaking opportunity so councelor French thank you

John French
1:20:44 (0:01:12)

for that I'm I want to focus in on what I think might be a trend with Developers the notion of building a standalone sales Center that from the very beginning is understood to be a temporary building once the project begins construction that a standalone building is either taken away or demolished whatever the case is and there are three examples right off the top of my head where such Standalone sales centers have been built and that has be thinking about the other projects that will say build a row of tow houses and have one of the units act as the sales Center on site so is it reasonable for Council to ask that we just not have developers come with us anymore or come to us with requests for these Standalone sales centers that we know eventually are just going to be

SPEAKER_02
1:21:56 (0:00:49)

demolished through the chair I'm going to tread very lightly here because I'm well outside my field of expertise I one thought is that this could be an excellent candidate for a to move to relocate so that could be something that could be asked it's like okay go ahead and do that but where is this building going next it'd be kind of interesting to be this traveling sales Center that goes between different developments but I do agree that you've put your point on a on an interesting inefficiency that could be dealt with but I will leave it to the planners and the Development Group to provide more insight onto how or if you can kind of control or sway that thank

SPEAKER_09
1:22:45 (0:00:04)

you thank you councelor Stoner on this point

Jenna Stoner
1:22:50 (0:00:14)

yeah I would just be curious I'm assuming that our demolition bylaw would apply to the deconstruction of a temporary sales Center and I think that maybe that's the area that we have control

SPEAKER_01
1:23:05 (0:00:22)

over through the chair yes it would apply any demolition there are some exemptions but this wouldn't be an exemption so it would apply having said that I see the point if it's only Built to be there for a temporary period of time it's worth considering how we could steer that

SPEAKER_08
1:23:27 (0:00:01)

more okay

SPEAKER_09
1:23:29 (0:00:46)

I have H quite a few so I'll try and split up maybe go two rounds here start off on the flexib on the idea of flexibility you mentioned that there are some actions that we were originally planning and we just for whatever reason Technologies shifted they're redundant not capacity so on and so forth we're asked to endorse a scope can you just speak to what flexibility you have in the actions or what we can do to make sure you have flexibility to adapt and be nimble because I think the mo the most important thing is getting the emission numbers down the actions I'm personally a little more comfortable being flexible on so what do we need to make do to make sure we have you have flexibility on those

SPEAKER_02
1:24:16 (0:01:22)

actions through the chair I strongly believe that the current CCAP provides that in a good way ironically one of the things that provides flexibility is that this plan doesn't quite get us to the to the numbers we need to so there's an acknowledgement within this plan that we need to do more that is in there I give a lot of credit to former mayor Elliot for I when I was presented with this idea like we have a plan that doesn't get us quite there I was quite not offended but I was like what where this is a plan to fail and mayor Elliot was like no this is a acknowledgement that this is a start so maybe in the next CCAP update we personally I would like to see enough actions in the there to hit the 45% Target but if that happens a strong kind of acknowledgement that some of these are going to have to come and go or this for that or maybe we have more actions that get us past the 45% Target and we say we have to hit N9 out of 10 of those so I do believe that the tone and tenor of the current plan does a really good job of that and I personally very our team really appreciates that but we'll have to be thoughtful about